Category Archives: Beyond India

Singapore: Bicentennial Fun

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ANURAG MALLICK and PRIYA GANAPATHY give a round up of this year’s Bicentennial celebrations in Singapore for Explorers, Foodies, Socialisers and Action Seekers 

Sentosa-Shrek & other theme rides IMG_1296_Anurag Mallick

In India’s Best Awards 2018, readers of T+L India & South Asia voted in big numbers for Singapore and its attractions. Not only did the country clinch the title of the Best International Family Destination, but Changi Airport also won the Best International Airport, Singapore Airlines was adjudged Best International Airline and Universal Studios Singapore and Resorts World Sentosa (RWS) grabbed trophies for the best Amusement Park and Integrated Resort respectively.

Long favoured by travellers from India, Singapore constantly evolves and reinvents itself for travellers of all ages and tastes. So whether you are an explorer or a foodie, an action seeker or a social butterfly, 2019 is the year to visit Singapore with mega events lined up to commemorate its bicentennial milestone.

Jurong Bird Park-The High Flyers show IMG_9865_Anurag Mallick

Explorers

Despite its diminutive size, there’s lots to explore in Singapore. Navigate through Changi Airport and discover why it is repeatedly voted the world’s best airport, with its delightful zones, Butterfly Garden, Orchid Garden and Cactus Garden. Feel like an adventurer at the Botanical Gardens, Jurong Bird Park, Singapore Zoo, River Safari (Asia’s first river-themed wildlife park) as you go on the world’s first Night Safari.

Take a heritage walk of Chinatown, Little India, Kampong Glam and Fort Canning or hike off the beaten path and do a canopy walk above trees at MacRitchie Reservoir. Discover hidden gems and vibrant street art as you explore charming neighbourhoods – Bugis-Bras Basah, the colourful shophouses in Haji Lane and Peranakan houses. At the Indian Heritage Centre trace the cultural transfusion in Southeast Asia through waves of migration between 1st-21st centuries.

Street Art-Haji Lane IMG_4281_Anurag Mallick

A new experiential showcase at Fort Canning tells the stories of Singapore’s early settlers and communities through historic trails with projection installations at Telok Ayer Street and augmented reality trails of the Singapore River and Fort Canning Park. Take a Battlebox tour of the 1930s underground bombproof chamber, the headquarters of the Malaya Command during World War II.

On 15 February, 1942 the decision to surrender Singapore to the Japanese was taken here by the British. Continue on the history trail to Fort Siloso, Singapore’s only preserved coastal fort. A lift rises 36.3m high to a viewing deck and the 200m long walkway snakes above the canopy with stunning views of the sea, ending at gun placements and the WWII Surrender Chamber.

Sentosa-Fort Siloso SkyWalk view IMG_1455_Anurag Mallick

For the explorer in you, Singapore has several museums –Philately Museum, Peranakan Museum, Changi Museum, Malay Heritage Centre, ArtScience Museum, Asian Civilizations Museum, National Museum of Singapore, Singapore City Gallery and the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum.

Trace the history of life on earth across 500,000 animal and plant specimens ranging from the world’s largest crab (Japanese Spider Crab) to the smallest (Coral Spider Crab), three dinosaurs from America (Prince, Apollonia and Twinky) and a 10.6m female sperm whale ‘Jubi Lee’ that washed ashore in Singapore in 2015. The dinosaur zone runs a Light Show every half-hour all day. And something new to look forward to each month…

Garden City-Gardens by the Bay Supertree Grove IMG_0931_Anurag Mallick

i Light Singapore – March
The bright lights of Singapore get brighter with the bicentennial edition of the sustainable light art festival and the theme ‘Bridges of Time’. Every evening in March, stroll down Singapore’s iconic riverfront, Marina Bay, the Civic District and Fort Canning to appreciate interactive installations by local and international artists.

Singapore Festival of Fun – 8-18 March
10-day festival with dining and entertainment experiences, besides stand up acts at the old bustling port Clarke Quay, now a hip lifestyle district

Indian Culture Fiesta – April
Celebrate the diversity of Indian culture at Indian Cultural Fiesta – a showcase of traditions, rituals and arts of 16 ethnic associations from different parts of India.

Hari Raya light up – June
Marking the end of the holy month of Ramadan is the festival of Eid or Hari Raya Aidilfitri. Watch the streets of Geylang Serai, Singapore’s largest Malay enclave light up with displays inspired by Malay art and cultural icons.

Rainforest Lumina – June-Dec
As part of Singapore Zoo’s 45th anniversary celebrations, take a walk on the wild side. Uncover stories and sensory treasures of nature with a first-of-its-kind show in Southeast Asia – audio-visual experience at 10 interactive zones, 7:30 pm onwards.

Singapore Night Festival – Aug
For two weekends in August, SNF transforms the Bugis-Bras Basah heritage precinct into a themed midsummer celebration with interactive light installations and events at art and cultural institutions.

Mid-Autumn Light up – Sep
Marking the end of the autumn harvest, the thanksgiving festival sees beautiful lanterns bedecking Chinatown. Sample mooncakes and teas at the street bazaars, watch night performances and take part in lantern-painting competitions.

Deepavali – Nov
A major cultural highlight, join the Silver Chariot Procession held twice in the lead-up to Diwali from Chinatown to Little India. Visit the Indian Heritage Centre building inspired by the Indian baoli (stepwell) where tabs and Augmented Reality take story-telling to another level. Choose a pagri/topi for a selfie at the headgear section.

Christmas on a Great Street – Dec
The annual Christmas Wonderland at Gardens by the Bay is a highlight of Singapore’s exciting year-end celebrations, with carnival games and rides. Go shopping at Orchard Road, skate under the stars and watch gardens come alive with large-scale illuminations at night.

Garden City-Gardens by the Bay Cloud Forest IMG_0806_Anurag Mallick

FACT FILE

What to Explore

The Original Singapore Walks
Ph +65 6325 1631 www.journeys.com.sg
Timings 9:30am, 2:30pm Guided tour S$38 Adults, S$18 children

National Gallery Singapore
Ph +65 6271 7000 www.nationalgallery.sg
Timings 10am-7pm (till 10 pm on Fri/Sat) Entry S$20 adults, S$15 children
Daily free guided art/architecture tours (20 slots) in English from Visitor Services Counter.

Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum (LKCNHM)
Ph +65 6601 3333 nhmvisit@nus.edu.sg
Timings 10am-7pm Entry S$21 adults, S$13 children 

Indian Heritage Centre, Little India
Ph +65 6291 1601 www.indianheritage.org.sg
Timings 10am-7pm Monday closed Entry S$4

Fort Siloso, Sentosa
Ph 1800 736 8672 www.sentosa.com.sg
Timings 10am-6pm Entry free, 90 min Guided Tour S$20 adults, S$14 children
Stay at the beach-facing Shangri-La’s Rasa Sentosa Resort and get a complimentary coupon!

The Battlebox, Fort Canning
Ph +65 6338 6133 www.battlebox.com.sg
Timings 9:45am-5pm Entry S$18-32

Food-Song Fa Bak kut teh IMG_9996-Anurag Mallick

Foodies

For the serious foodie, there’s no better place than Singapore! Ten of the Top 50 restaurants in Asia can be found here. This is the birthplace of the Singapore chilli crab and the iconic Singapore Sling, a gin-based cocktail infused with Grenadine invented in 1912 at the Raffles Hotel. When the Americans came here after World War II, someone stuffed country sandwich bread with meat and eggs to create an Asian version of the Philly Cheese Steak sandwich – called Roti John! Ingenuity is in Singapore’s genes. Here, temperamental celebrity chefs meet their match with ordinary vendors in Street Food Challenges.

With limited space available, Singapore loves to repurpose the old and reinvent itself. Lau Pa Sat, once a Victorian era wet market, transforms into a pedestrian-only street food centre by evening. The erstwhile British cantonment Dempsey Hill is now a plush entertainment and F&B quarter. Ann Siang Hill, earlier a nutmeg and mace plantation, is now a vibrant precinct with rooftop bars and restaurants. CHIJMES, the 1841 Church of Infant Jesus was renovated from a religious complex to a modern restaurant complex and renamed after the peal of the church bells.

Reinterpreted Spaces-Lau Pa Sat open air food stalls IMG_7256_Anurag Mallick

From legendary hawker centres to Michelin star restaurants, the sheer diversity of dining locations in Singapore is tantalizing. Discover the ‘City in a Garden’ as you dine at IndoChine in a SuperTree at Gardens by the Bay, enjoy the breezy outdoors at Satay by the Bay or opt for a 7-course degustation menu at Pollen inside the Flower Dome in a plush indoor setting. The 34-seater Gourmet Bus combines gourmet dining with sightseeing.

Changi ranks second after Hong Kong as the world’s best airport for dining with Singapore’s top street food icons found right inside. Straits Food Village, a 24 hr food court awarded Airport Food Court of the Year at the Airport Food and Beverage (FAB) Awards 2016 captures the classic hawker experience. This year, The World’s 50 Best Restaurants, hailed as ‘the Oscars of global gastronomy’ will be held in Singapore in a year packed with events.

Long Bar Raffles Hotel-Singapore Sling IMG_7657_Anurag Mallick

World Gourmet Summit (WGS) – 2-4 April
Gourmet fare, fine wines and wonderful dining experiences mark Asia’s premier haute cuisine festival. The 23rd edition features top masterchefs and local culinary talents serving dinners, brunches, masterclasses and more.

Asia’s 50 Best Bars – May
An exciting showcase of the superlative and most innovative in the drinks industry, where foodies can sample bold award-winning concoctions and bar food. Check out cutting edge bars like Operation Dagger and Oxwell and Co at Ann Siang Hill, Dempsey Hill and Holland village.

The World’s 50 Best Restaurants – June
Hosted in Asia for the first time, the gala awards celebrate culinary innovation and diversity through bespoke dinners, interactive masterclasses and live discussions. Breeze through restaurants at Clarke Quay, CHJIMES and Orchard.

Hari Raya Light up – June
Spectacular light installations with traditional Malay icons all month long as a lead up to Hari Raya Aidilfitri. The atmospheric Geylang Serai bazaar is lined with hundreds of shops selling decorations, clothing and food, ranging from traditional to modern Muslim cuisine, cookies, cakes, deep-fried snacks and spicy meals.

Singapore Food Festival – July
The best of local cuisine and live music, explore the city through its traditional and contemporary food, with cultural tours, workshops and events across the island. SFF’s signature event STREAT is a weekend pop-up restaurant with Singapore’s top chefs serving a specially curated menu of modern Singaporean cuisine.

Deepavali – Oct
The annual Hindu festival of light is a good time to head to Little India to see locals dress up in new clothes to enjoy the bright lights. Foodies can try festive delicacies like murukku (savoury twists), athirasam (sweet doughnuts), laddus and Diwali sweets at the Deepavali Festival Village.

Wine Fiesta 2019 – Oct
Pair wine tasting with gourmet treats prepared by renowned chefs while sampling top wines from across the world in different styles, with expert classes by winemakers.

Singapore River Festival – Nov
A two-day extravaganza across Boat Quay, Robertson Quay and Clarke Quay; dine at discounted prices at eateries along the riverside. From smoky tandoori meats to seafood and funked up local fare like Chicken Rice Arancini with Sambal Aioli, nibble around in a festive atmosphere with lights, outdoor dance floors and art installations.

Christmas – Dec
All the action moves to Orchard Road with Yuletide delicacies at the Christmas Village, food pop-ups and seasonal Christmas delights.

National Gallery-Posing with 3D masterpieces_Anurag Mallick

Socialisers

Singapore’s heady world of bars, clubs and galleries is just the place for people who love to socialize. Brush shoulders with celebrity figures at Madame Tussauds and pop by at the National Gallery, the largest museum and visual arts venue in Singapore. With 8,000 artworks spread over 6,90,000 sq ft, it is the largest public collection of Singapore and Southeast Asian art in the world.

It is housed in two national monuments – the former Supreme Court Building and City Hall where Admiral Lord Mountbatten accepted the Japanese surrender on 12 September 1945. Beautifully restored with an award-winning glass-metal façade, explore its prison cells and Rotunda (round library) and survey the cityscape and historic padang (ground) from the terrace deck.

Garden City-Padang or ground with trees IMG_7559_Anurag Mallick

Rooftop bars, underground clubs, whiskey bars, hip speakeasies; you’ll find them all in Singapore at vibrant nightlife hotspots like Ann Siang Hill, Orchard, Dempsey Hill, Clarke Quay and Boat Quay. Try out cutting edge cocktails and ingenuity in mixology as you go club hopping from Attica to Altitude, the world’s highest alfresco bar on the 63rd floor of 1 Raffles Place.

At Bar Stories in Haji Lane, try Miss Joaquim, a cocktail inspired by Singapore’s national flower, the Vanda Miss Joaquim, made from ingredients of Chinatown where the flower was first propagated. At Ah Sam Cold Drink Stall, relish cocktails using distinctly Singaporean and Asian ingredients such as laksa leaves (savoury herb), coconut milk and gula melaka (palm sugar).

Reinterpreted Spaces-Underground bunker now hip bar Operation Dropout-IMG_0628-Anurag Mallick

Live it up while staying at the most iconic hotels from Chinatown to Downtown – soak in the old world heritage of Fullerton or Raffles Hotel and relax in the world’s largest rooftop pool while looking over Singapore’s skyline at Marina Bay Sands.

From beach parties, outdoor concerts to festivals that celebrate diverse genres like club culture, Formula 1 racing, mixed martial arts, e-sports to Japanese anime, it’s a dizzying calendar building up to a crescendo in December.

Reinterpreted Spaces-Ann Siang Hill IMG_0623-Anurag Mallick

Singapore International Jazz Festival – March
The perfect venue to immerse in a music-filled weekend with world-class music from classical jazz to legendary blues performances.

Singapore Cocktail Festival – May
Asia’s largest celebration of cocktails and an opportunity to interact with an international line-up of mixologists and savour artisanal spirits.

The Asia’s 50 Best Bars – May
Showcases and honours the best and most innovative talents in the drinks industry with a chance to sample their award-winning concoctions.

Ultra Singapore – June
An EDM festival over two days featuring top electronic, house and techno acts. Buzzing festival atmosphere, unparalleled stage design, top-notch production and a tribe of partygoers ready to groove from dusk to dawn.

The F1 Singapore Grand Prix – 13-22 Sep
Undoubtedly, the crown jewel of Singapore’s event calendar, the iconic FORMULA 1 night race revs up for its twelfth edition in 2019. Catch the best of Singapore’s vibrant lifestyle experiences – bigger parties, special menus and exciting retail promotions.

Wine Fiesta – Oct
Taste fine wines from across the world, expert-led classes and knowledge sharing by winemakers. Wine tastings are paired with specially curated gourmet fare.

Singapore River Festival – Oct
An immersive extravaganza along Boat Quay, Robertson Quay and Clarke Quay, appreciate numerous light and art installations, go party hopping while enjoying F&B promotions and outdoor discotheques.

C3 Anime Festival Asia – Dec
The eleventh edition promises to be the biggest, boldest Japanese pop culture event showcasing exciting Japanese anime, iconic characters, interesting comics, games and more. Dress up as your favourite anime character and mingle with fellow otakus (anime and manga geeks)

Zouk Out – 1-2 Dec
With 16 hours of epic EDM tunes, 30,000 guests and the world’s tops DJs, Asia’s largest dance music festival is back at Siloso beach. Organised by homegrown club Zouk, the 19th edition boasts international DJs as stages, bars and food stalls spread across the sprawling festival grounds. Get wowed by laser shows, pyrotechnics, back-to-back DJ sets and a cool Mambo Jambo beach party.

Marina Bay Singapore Countdown – Dec
Ring in the New Year at the iconic carnival in the heart of the city from early evening into the night. The Countdown party has an electric atmosphere with stunning visual displays and fireworks. Catch light projection shows at The Merlion statue, Fullerton Hotel and ArtScience Museum besides a Food Truck Fest.

IMG_7299_The Club Hotel Singapore-Anurag Mallick

FACT FILE
Where to Stay

Marina Bay Sands Hotel
Ph +65 6688 8888 www.marinabaysands.com

Oasia Hotel Downtown
Ph +65 6664 0333 www.stayfareast.com

Shangri-La’s Rasa Sentosa
Ph +65 6275 0100 www.shangri-la.com

Crowne Plaza Changi
Ph +65 6823 5300 www.ihg.com

Singapore Marriott Tang Plaza Hotel, Orchard Road
Ph +65 6735 5800 www.marriott.com

Raffles Hotel
Ph +65 6337 1886 www.rafflessingapore.com/

The Fullerton Hotel Singapore
Ph +65 6733 8388 www.fullertonhotels.com

Sofitel So Singapore
Ph +65 6701 6800 www.sofitel-so-singapore.com/

Swissôtel Merchant Court
Ph +65 6239 1848 www.swissotel.com

Night life-Fire dancers at Night Safari IMG_9674_Anurag Mallick

Action-seekers

Singapore is a small dynamo buzzing with activities and adventures for any action seeker. Right at Changi Airport, whizz down 4 storeys of The Slide@T3, Singapore’s tallest slide and the world’s tallest slide in an airport. At Universal Studios, scream your lungs out and feel the rush of adrenalin at the hair-raising 4D Transformer, Battlestar Galactica and movie-inspired rides and roller coasters.

Get splashed at Adventure Cove waterpark, go on Segway rides, get face to face with marine creatures at S.E.A. Aquarium – the largest in the world, take the Skyline Luge – the first in South East Asia, tackle obstacle courses at Mega Adventure and zip down a 450m long zipline, experience the rush of indoor skydiving in the world’s first themed wind tunnel at i -Fly, try wave riding at Wave House Sentosa, brave spills and thrills at Sentosa 4D Adventureland, go gaming at Resorts World and enjoy the view from the revolving Tiger Sky Tower. Pause to catch your breath, for this is just Sentosa!

Sentosa-Luge IMG_1212_Anurag Mallick

A great perch to see the city by night is the Singapore Flyer, which at 165m was the world’s tallest Ferris wheel until the High Roller of Las Vegas upstaged it in 2014. It’s still the largest observation wheel in Asia! While at the Flyer, try the new 737-800 flight simulator and sit in the captain’s seat of the world’s most popular jet airliner. Learn to take-off, cruise and land the plane at an airport of your choice in an immersive experience with real-size cockpits and aircraft controls. At the Flyer you could also reserve a pod for a private 3-course dinner.

Action seekers will love the various laser shows in Singapore – from Wings of Time (S$18, 7:40pm, 8:40pm) at Sentosa, WonderFull (8pm, 9:30pm) at Marina Bay Sands or Garden Rhapsody (7:45pm, 8:45pm) at the SuperTree grove in Gardens by the Bay; the latter two being free to public. From top-notch rugby and football to UFC fight nights and Grand Prix races, each event comes with its own entertainment package. So no matter when you choose to visit Singapore, there’s always some action at hand…

Night life-Clarke Quay IMG_7888-Anurag Mallick

HSBC Singapore Rugby Sevens – 13-14 April
Watch the world’s best rugby teams tackle each other in an adrenalin-pumping encounter and a non-stop carnival atmosphere at Singapore Sports Hub

JSSL Singapore Professional Academy 7s 2019 – 19-21 April
Showcases top level football with football experts offering insights at the JSSL Singapore Football Coaching Convention.

UFC Fight Night Singapore – June
Witness top mixed martial arts athletes compete in the world’s most intimidating arena, the Octagon©. In the lead up to UFC Fight Night, activities like Open Workout will be held for the growing MMA fan base in the region.

International Champions Cup – July
A golden opportunity for football fans to catch their favourite clubs and players in action. Top teams from around the world play against each another in Singapore during the pre-season resulting in world-class football matches.

2019 Formula 1 Singapore Grand Prix – 20-22 Sep
Experience full-throttle high adrenaline action that comes in a gust of wind and speed. The twelfth edition of the iconic FORMULA 1 night race brings out the best of Singapore’s vibrant lifestyle experiences – wilder parties, special menus, retail discounts and performances by Fatboy Slim and Toots & the Maytals.

PVP eSports Championship – Oct
Online gaming fans and action seekers will enjoy the thrilling e-sports competition as teams from Singapore and the region compete for a prize pool of US$300,000.

Standard Chartered Marathon – Dec
The marquee running event on Singapore’s sporting calendar where thousands run past iconic landmarks. Explore the city and its pretty landscape while testing your endurance in a tropical climate.

Reinterpreted Spaces-Ann Siang Hill once a spice plantation IMG_0636_Anurag Mallick

FACT FILE

Getting there:
Singapore Airlines flies direct (around 4 hrs) from Bengaluru, Chennai and other cities to Changi Airport www.singaporeair.com

Changi Airport
https://in.changiairport.com

Flight Experience, Singapore Flyer
Ph +65 6339 2737, 1800 737 0800 www.flightexperience.com.sg
Timings 10am-10pm Entry S$175

Universal Studios, Sentosa
Ph +65 6577 8888 www.rwsentosa.com
Timings 10am-7pm Entry S$74 adults, S$56 children, VIP Tour Unlimited Access S$298

Singapore Grand Prix
Ph +65 6738 6738 www.singaporegp.sg

For more info, visit www.yoursingapore.com

Authors: Anurag Mallick & Priya Ganapathy. This article appeared as part of a special feature in the March 2019 issue of Travel + Leisure India magazine.

Thun: A Swiss love affair

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ANURAG MALLICK and PRIYA GANAPATHY explore Thun, one of the most beautiful medieval towns in Switzerland and the gateway to the scenic Bernese Oberland

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Switzerland… the very name invokes images of romantic holidays in cozy wooden chalets and ski resorts, wildflowers bobbing in alpine meadows, warm fondue and raclette on wintry evenings and cows grazing in idyllic pastures, their bells tinkling softly, as farm fresh milk is crafted into fine chocolate and 450 varieties of cheese.

For years, Switzerland has been the gold standard for what a mountain destination should be, with hill stations around the world claiming the epithet ‘The Switzerland of ___’. Only when you visit Switzerland do you realize that every cliché – picture postcard homes, snowy peaks and placid lakes the colour of copper sulphate – is actually true…

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It’s not hard to see why artists, poets and writers have always been enchanted by Switzerland. Johanna Spyri set the tales of Heidi in the Swiss countryside. The glaciers, lakes and mountains inspired Swiss painters like Caspar Wolf, Ferdinanad Hodler and Giovanni Giacometti, poet Lord Byron and writers like Mark Twain. Composer Goethe wrote his poem “Song of the Spirits over the waters” after seeing the Staubbach Falls in 1779 while JRR Tolkein based his Lord of the Rings saga of ‘Rivendell’ after a trip to Lauterbrunnen Valley.

India’s love affair with Switzerland is largely credited to director Yash Chopra who spent his honeymoon there in 1970. Captivated by the heavenly natural beauty, he featured the Swiss meadows and mountains for the first time in his 1985 film Faasle. The saga continued with his 1989 film Chandni and DDLJ in 1995. Millions were captivated by the landscapes, cobbled streets and pretty bridges of the Swiss countryside, a signature backdrop for Yash Raj Films. Lauenensee, a lake in Canton Bern that served as a prominent locale, was dubbed ‘Yash Chopra Lake’.

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For promoting Brand Switzerland, Chopra was given the honorary title ‘Ambassador of Interlaken’ on 8 April 2011 and in May 2016, a bronze statue was installed off Interlaken’s main street Hoheweg near Casino Kursal with a silver plaque dedicated to him. Jungfrau Railways named a train after him; the only other person to share this honour is the man who founded Jungfraubahn railway, Adolf Guyer-Zeller himself (Train 211)! The Victoria Jungfrau hotel in Interlaken has a special deluxe cinema-themed suite named after him (CHF 2250) decorated with Veer Zaara posters.

While Jungfraujoch continues to be the top Swiss destination, there are several pretty nooks overlooked by most vacationers. One such place is the medieval town of Thun. Located on the western edge of Thunersee (Lake Thun) where the Aare river flows out, it was the traditional gateway to the Bernese Alps. With the Eiger, Mönch and Jungfrau gleaming with eternal snow across the lake, the picturesque town is crisscrossed with bridges where couples walk hand in hand past pretty hanging flower baskets as weeping willows cascade into crystal clear waters.

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“Thun is to the Jungfrau region what the overture is to the opera,” exclaimed our guide Elisabeth Mettler at the Bahnhof (train station). “We open the door to the Bernese Oberland and one can reach the best places to ski and hike – Wengen, Murren and Grindelwald – in just an hour.” Unlike the financial capital Zurich, the Canton of Bern is known for its unhurried approach to life. People love to take things slow and enjoy a small coffee or beer at the cafes by the Aare. Stores in the old town often close for lunch and a leisurely heritage walk is the best way to explore town.

We walked from the station down Othmar-Schoeck Weg, named after a Swiss composer; just across the riverbank lay Brahms Quay, named after another famous composer. Many roads and alleys are named after eminent personalities who spent weeks holidaying in Thun. Constant floods led the city folk to divert the river through a dry moat creating the island of Bälliz, today the main shopping district.

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Five bridges connect Bälliz to the medieval city center and we took the quaint Untere Schleuse (upper flood gate), a covered wooden bridge originally built in 1724. Together with the lower sluice, they regulate the water flow of the Aare river. If all 20 gates are opened, it will lower the lake’s level by 20 cm in a day, explained our guide.

The spot where the water gushed out of the sluices was the city’s Surf Point where surfboarders practiced against roiling waves. In July-Aug, the city’s youngsters line the riverfront in beachwear, often jumping into the waters to cool off and Thun resembles Rio or Hawaii than a typical Swiss town.

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Around the scenic lake you’ll find the oldest sailing school of Switzerland and the largest garrison. In the 1830s, the Knechtenhofer brothers laid the foundation for boat excursions on Lake Thun. They ordered an iron steamboat ‘Bellevue’ from Paris for their hotel De Bains le Vielle Viel, the first in Thun with tapped water in the rooms. The steamer had an organ that played God Save the Queen!

Grand Hotel Thunerhof, built in 1875, was once the most luxurious address in the Bernese Oberland that hosted kings, emperors and czars. Now converted into town offices, the ground floor houses the Kunstmuseum dedicated to contemporary art with a small coffee shop next door.

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Our hotel Freienhof was one of the earliest inns in Thun overlooking the Sinnebrucke Bridge, the oldest river crossing between Bern and Interlaken. Another former hotel Beau Rivage today has the best Italian restaurant in town, Da Domenico Beau Rivage. Thun is a beautiful old town with charming monuments.

We walked past a reddish building – the narrowest in Switzerland, and the Knechtenhofer House where Napoleon III, nephew of Napoleon Bonaparte stayed. At the heart of town is Mill Square where yellow outlines mark the spot where the mill once stood. Now it’s a leisure spot perfect in summer to quaff beer; in winter time, the chairs are draped in wool, fur and blankets for people to snugly enjoy coffee and hot chocolate.

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Thun’s town square is one of the most beautiful in Switzerland. The Rathaus (Town Hall) dates back to 1500. Back then, there were no banks and money was kept in the stadt kirche (city church). A theft led to a treasury tower being added in 1585. Former guild houses of bakers and butchers now double up as hotels and restaurants.

Walking down Obere Hauptgasse (Upper Main Street), we marveled at the boutiques along the unique raised pavements in Altstadt (Old Town), peculiar to Thun. Be it herb shops like Secret Nature or Catlovers, the only dedicated cat shop in Switzerland, there’s a surprise lurking at every corner. At the east end of the cobbled street, a long flight of stairs called Kirchtreppe led up to Thun Schloss (castle).

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Lording over town on Castle Hill, the medieval Thun Schloss was built around 1190 by Duke Bertold V of Zähringen. We trudged up, pausing for a breath at a pavilion with lovely murals on the ceiling. This ‘fortified hill’, dunum in Celtic, gave the town its name. The majestic donjon or keep capping the citadel is the city’s famous landmark and the knight’s hall, one of the best preserved and largest surviving Swiss banquet halls of the High Middle Ages.

In 1888, a Historical Museum was opened in the castle and for a while the jailer was also the ticket seller and guard for the museum! The medieval castle also houses a restaurant, prison, court and well with the corner turrets offering 360-degree views over town.

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Staying at Hotel Freienhof entitled us to the PanoramaCard (similar to the Zurich Card). Besides the free Thun city tour, we got complimentary bus rides. At Oberhofen, the lakeside Schloss (castle) was set in a landscaped park with its picturesque lake turret jutting out of the waters. Our visit coincided with the annual Castle Day and locals in period costumes livened up the proceedings.

A hat rack had various period headgear for visitors to try on! A tour of the castle, plush chambers and 19th century servants’ quarters revealed how nobility and their domestic staff lived. The medieval keep with an oriental smoking lounge was stunning. We headed next to Spiez, with its scenic marina, vineyards and castle with a Romanesque church on a beautiful peninsula by the lake.

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But the highlight was the romantic boat cruise on Lake Thun with BLS Navigation. With special fondue dinners and wine sourced from the vineyards of Spiez, it was a lovely ride past little towns and mountains like the ‘Swiss Pyramid’ Mount Niesen and Stockhorn.

We clinked our glasses and gazed at the fiery sunset with the Swiss flag of our vessel ‘Stadt Thun’ fluttering the breeze. We half expected credits to roll or a director’s voice to shout ‘Cut’.

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FACT FILE

Getting there
Fly Swiss www.swiss.com from Mumbai to Zürich International Airport (8 hr 55 min). Board an SBB (Swiss Federal Railways) train www.SwissTravelSystem.com via Bern (1hr 20 min) to Thun. BLS Navigation www.bls.ch runs nine boats on lakes Thun and Brienz.

Berner Oberland Bahn (BOB) from Interlaken Ost station provides the first stage of mountain railway routes like Wengernalpbahn (WAB) and Jungfraubahn (JB) to Grindelwald, Lauterbrunnen, Wengen, Kleine Scheidegg and Europe’s highest station at Jungfraujoch. A 3-day Jungfrau VIP pass with unlimited travel costs CHF 235 (available from 1 May-26 Oct at all stations). www.jungfrau.ch

PanoramaCard
While staying overnight in one of the participating hotels in the Lake Thun region you receive a complimentary PanoramaCard that offers free rides on city buses and trams no matter where you stay between Thun and Interlaken, with discounted admission to public pools, castles, museums, nature parks and a free guided city tour in Thun.

When to Go
Every Wed and Sat, farmers markets are held in the Bälliz, flea markets on every first Sat of the month on Mühleplatz and an artisan market every fourth Sat of the month at Waisenhausplatz. Thunfest in early August is the largest city open-air festival in Switzerland. Thun’s Fulehung Folk festival is held on the last weekend in Sep and marked with colourful street parades. In Nov-Dec, the town centre is decked up with Advent and Christmas markets while local hunters sell their fox furs and showcase their trophies in the annual fur market (second Sat in Feb) near Hotel Freienhof.

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STAY

Thun
Hotel Freienhof
Freienhofgasse 3
Ph +41 33 2275050
www.freienhof.ch
After the original hotel was burnt down, a newer one was built in 1958 and renovated in 2006. Great location by the river in the city center close to the station with complimentary breakfast. You’ll find the room numbers on the ceiling!

Hotel Krone
Obere Hauptgasse 2
Ph +41 33 227 88 88
www.krone-thun.ch
Located in the main square, the 15th century guild house of the bakers became an inn in 1821 and has been privately owned since 1852. Today it’s a charming 4-star hotel on the historic Rathausplatz.

Interlaken
Victoria Jungfrau Grand Hotel & Spa
Höheweg 41
Ph +41 33 828 28 28
www.victoria-jungfrau.ch
Overlooking the large central park Höhematte and Jungfrau in the distance, it is easily the best address in town (doubles CHF 438-588) with a fine Italian restaurant and the award-winning Nescens spa.

Hotel Carlton-Europe
Höheweg 94
Ph +41 33 826 01 60
www.carltoneurope.ch
An Art Nouveau hotel with over a century of hospitality (doubles CHF 158); from 1 Jan 2019 it is the first Swiss ‘adults only hotel’ that accommodates only guests over 16 years.

Zurich
Hotel Ni-Mo
Seefeldstrasse 16
Ph +41 44 370 30 30
www.hotel-nimo.ch
Cool boutique hotel in downtown Zurich’s Seefeld district, walking distance from Lake Zurich’s promenade, Opera House and famous shopping mile Bahnhofstrasse. Rooms are named after the sights they overlook, with amazing self-service breakfast.

For more info, visit www.thunersee.ch and www.myswitzerland.com

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Authors: Anurag Mallick & Priya Ganapathy. This article appeared in the February 2019 issue of Travel + Leisure magazine.

Rwanda: Planet of the Apes

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ANURAG MALLICK and PRIYA GANAPATHY take part in Rwanda’s annual naming ceremony of young mountain gorillas and explore the wildlife reserves of this dime-sized country 

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Think Africa and herds of big game roaming the plains and grasslands of a vast continent come to mind. Wedged between mighty Kenya, Tanzania and DRC (Democratic Republic of Congo), one wonders what a dime-sized country like Rwanda can offer. Yet, it stands tall in wildlife circles as one of the few places in the world where you can see mountain gorillas in their natural habitat. Thanks to an invite to attend the gorilla-naming ceremony Kwita Izina, we found ourselves on a direct Rwand Air flight from Mumbai to Kigali.

It was an early morning touchdown, yet Jullesse, the cheery representative from Rwanda Development Board was there to greet us and whisk us away to our hotel. En route we got a crash course on the cultural significance of Rwanda’s biggest wildlife and conservation event. Virunga Massif, a dramatic volcano-ridden landscape of 160 sq km at the tri-junction of DRC, Uganda and Rwanda is the last refuge of the mountain gorilla.

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Strife, poaching and encroachment in the region had led to a rapid decline in their population to an all-time low of 242 in 1981. Conservation efforts spearheaded by American primatologist Dian Fossey (‘Gorillas in the Mist’ fame) and tirelessly monitoring of gorilla families up the steep slopes all year round led to a slow revival.

For centuries, newborn children in Rwanda have been named in a ceremony called Kwita Izina. Taking the idea forward, Rwanda Development Board adopted a unique conservation initiative to celebrate the birth of baby mountain gorillas born in the wild. Since 2005, the annual naming ceremony has involved local communities and a galaxy of statesmen and conservationists from around the world chosen as celebrity namers. With few days to go for the official ceremony, we had the perfect opportunity to explore the capital city.

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Our base was the swish Kigali Marriott Hotel, one of the first international hotel chains to open in Rwanda. Located in the diplomatic enclave of Kiyovu in the posh CBD (Central Business District), it overlooked the high-security presidential quarters. We walked past the Gorilla Statue near the Town Hall to Kandt House Museum, the first brick building in town. It was the home of German explorer and administrator Richard Kandt, Kigali’s founder and the country’s first Resident.

His statue stood in the front of the building, which earlier housed the Museum of Natural History. A small collection of snakes like the Black Mamba and Gabon viper in a small enclosure at the back, a baby crocodile in a pond and a gorilla in a glass case are the only remnants of the former museum, which currently showcases Rwanda’s cultural, geographic and colonial past.

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Back at the hotel at Iriba Bar & Terrace, we grabbed some local ‘Question Coffee’ sourced from a women’s co-operative and fried sambaza (local fish) and brochettes or skewered meat cubes with roasted ibirayi (Irish potatoes). After a relaxing Dead Sea mud therapy at the spa and evening happy hours at the Executive Lounge, we dined at Soko restaurant, with traditional woven agasake baskets lining the walls. The hotel had a Go Kigali outlet where we booked a local city tour the next day.

Led by our friendly guide Colombe, we headed to Mount Kigali for a panoramic view over town. The pine forests were serene except for a troupe of furtive blue-balled Vervet monkeys. We trawled local milk bars, mural walks, Gaddafi Mosque and the Muslim quarter of Nyamirambo, Kigali’s hip neighbourhood. At Kimironko market we marveled at the varieties of multi-hued beans and tasted Rwandan produce like tree tomato and passion fruit. Our tour ended at a local eatery Tamu Tamu where we tried the Rwandan staple ugali (cassava porridge), stewed cassava leaves, fried fish and goat curry.IMG_2518

The next morning we left early for Volcanoes National Park for our first brush with gorillas. Women dressed in colourful kitenge carried headloads of sweet potato, banana and cassava to reach local markets by dawn while men pedaled furiously balancing bundles of sugarcane or stacks of carrots and charcoal.

The mist covered volcanoes towered above the hilly landscape. Five of the eight volcanoes – Muhabura, Gahinga, Sabyinyo, Bisoke and Karisimbi – were in Rwanda. Had we known that fifteen minutes later we would be assigned to Karisimbi, the tallest of them at 4500m, we wouldn’t have been smiling!

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Soon, we disembarked at the busy park headquarters at Kinigi near Musanze. Only twelve gorilla trekking routes were open to tourists and each trekking group had eight members. We got the tough Isimbi trail led by the petite young guide Jolie. Briefing us on gorilla behaviour and language, she explained the various grunts, calls and gestures, warning us to approach them submissively.

“Crouch low and repeat ‘Mae-mmhh’, which means ‘we come in peace.’ We practiced obediently like kindergarten children. Gaiters (leg guards), rain jackets and gloves were offered on hire, but we smugly looked at our Decathlon-acquired shoes and rain jackets and politely declined.

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Driving an hour past bustling markets, small villages and waving kids we reached the edge of a forest where porters in blue uniforms awaited us with walking sticks carved with gorilla figures. The wise among us took porters for their backpacks and camera equipment. Little did we know what awaited us on the Umusumba Trekking Trail.

The hike got progressively tougher as we started to climb – a slippery path of bamboo leaves, a tangle of vines to ensnare you, bamboo stumps waiting to trip you, squelchy pathways, dense undergrowth and steep inclines lined with stinging nettle. Ah, that’s why the gloves, we winced and cursed! After plodding for nearly two hours, we reached our trackers and made a final insane climb.

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Lolling on a bed of nettles in a clearing was the Isimbi family. Watching over the ten juveniles and eight females was mighty Muturengere, a 200 kg 1.9m tall Silverback – adult males get a distinct silvery band on the back on maturity. The furry little gorillas played around with wild fruits, before ambling towards us in curiosity.

We bleated our pacifist calls repeatedly until Muturengere grunted his approval. An hour elapsed in the blink of an eye. All of a sudden, Muturengere got up, walked past us meters away, raised his head and disappeared into the bush. The mist rolled in and we descended the lower slopes of Karisimbi where we spotted a Golden Monkey.

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Rwanda is a small hilly country and it is easy to move around. We drove south on our primate tour to Nyungwe National Park to track Colobus monkeys. They get their names not after the explorer but from the Greek word kolobos, meaning handicapped as they do not have a thumb. Thanks to its long cloak of black hair with white shoulder streaks, it is also called Judge Monkey!

On the hike to the Kamiranzovu waterfall we spotted a dark coated L’Hoest Monkey or mountain monkey furtively scurry on all fours through the dense undergrowth. From Uwinka Overlook we took the Igishigishigi Trail, named after the giant tree fern, to the Canopy Walkway, the first in East Africa. Built in three sections with the longest one stretching 90m and 57m above the forest floor, it’s narrow and shaky but gives unmatched views.

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We didn’t have time for the longer Chimpanzee hike and returned to Kinigi in time for Kwita Izina 2018, where 23 gorillas born in the past year were being named. The massive gathering at the base of Volcanoes National Park wore a festive air with locals and volunteers waving Rwandan flags, dancing and cheering on.

Against a stunning backdrop of the volcanoes was a giant gorilla frame made of bamboo with an infant riding on its back. Headlining the event was South African pop duo Mafikizolo, who were also part of the celebrity namers that included sportsmen, ambassadors, businessmen and environmentalists.

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Life came full circle as the unnamed newborns from the Isimbi family we spotted earlier got beautiful names in the Kinyarwanda dialect – Umuseke (dawn) and Izahabu (gold), named by female Arsenal star Alexandra Virina Scott. Fellow Arsenal legend and Cameroonian footballer Laureno Bisan Etamé-Mayer named his li’l gorilla from the Kwitonda family Ikipe (team).

Pop icon Akon couldn’t make it but his business partner and Malian philanthropist Samba Bathily named his newborn gorilla from the Igisha family Ineza (mercy), which he believed was needed for Africa and the world. Senegalese NBA star Amadou Gallo Fall had launched junior NBA in Kigali and his focus was on using the power of sport and values of the game. He named his baby gorilla from Musilikare family Kwiyongera (to increase).

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Each namer had a personal angle. Dr Noeline Raondry Rakotoarisa, program chief at UNESCO, had been visiting Rwanda for the last 11 years and confessed each time she saw a new Rwanda because it was moving so fast! The geographic area of 686 biosphere reserves in 122 countries was home to over 256 million people, so her name for the Igisha family newborn was Imbaga (crowd). UN Special Envoy, President and CEO of the Asia Society and ex-Vice Chairman of the World Economic Forum Josette Sheeran named her baby gorilla from the Pablo family Umuryango (family).

English celebrity chef, food writer and eco campaigner Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, also VP of Flora & Fauna International UK had met the newborn of the Hirwa family just a week earlier and decided to name it Amatungo (plentiful livestock), the bedrock of Rwandan culture.

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Peter Riedel, President and COO of electronics group Rhode Schwarz International, on his first trip to Africa, named his newborn Umusaruro (harvest). The final namer Madame Graca Machel, former First Lady of South Africa and Mozambique, named her Kwitonda newborn Urugori (crown).

The ceremony gave way to a moving environment-themed performance by a dance troupe. As world leaders applauded and the world cheered on, it was amazing to see how a tiny country was leading the way as a beacon for conservation. The genius of Rwanda was that it had created an international event out of a domestic population census! We headed to Serena Hotels at Lake Kivu for a lavish lakeside gala dinner with a private performance by Mafikizolo humming songs of Africa.

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FACT FILE

Getting there
The national carrier Rwand Air flies direct from Mumbai to Kigali in 7 hrs four times a week (Mon, Wed, Fri, Sat). www.rwandair.com

Where to Stay
Kigali Marriott Hotel www.marriott.com
Serena Hotel Kigali & Lake Kivu www.serenahotels.com
One & Only Nyungwe House www.oneandonlyresorts.com
Gorillas Volcanoes Hotel, Ruhengeri

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Entry
Only 96 permits are issued per day with each permit costing $1500. Visa on arrival costs $30. An East African combined visa covering Rwanda, Uganda and Tanzania costs $100.

Must Do
Wildlife Tours Rwanda www.wildlifetours-rwanda.com
Gorilla trekking at Volcanoes National Park www.volcanoesnationalparkrwanda.com
Track Colobus, Golden and mountain monkeys at Nyungwe National Park
Spot the Big 5 at Akagera National Park
Kigali city tour with Go Kigali Tours, $60/person 9:30am-1pm, 2-6pm
Try the local ‘Question’ Coffee and Rwandan tea; eat local at Tamu Tamu
Shop for souvenirs like agasake (peace baskets)

For more info, www.visitrwanda.com

Authors: Anurag Mallick & Priya Ganapathy. This article appeared on 13 January, 2019 in Deccan Herald newspaper.

 

Garut: Sweet Taste of Indonesia

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Blessed with a serene natural ambience, Garut, the Switzerland of Indonesia, holds the charm of a land meant for indolent lotus eaters, says PRIYA GANAPATHY

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With Javanese love songs lulling us to sleep on the drive from Bandung to Garut, we reached the gorgeous Kampung Sumber Alam, an exclusive hot springs spa resort. The ‘Garden of Water’ was a virtual floating island of wooden cottages in a lotus-riddled aquatic Eden. A fine example of Sundanese architecture, the roofing was done with the hairy aren palm and shaped like a birdwing! Under a moonlit starry night, it didn’t take us long to immerse ourselves in the thermal swimming pool partly covered by a large sail-like marquee.

Garut’s high altitude ensures year-round cold weather and its gorgeous misty natural surroundings have earned it the tag ‘Switzerland of Java’. The presence of healing thermal baths offering rejuvenative spa treatments give it the air of a European spa town. The chill weather contrasts the novelty of the pools that remain permanently hot with water channelled directly from the volcanic Mount Guntur nearby.

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The thermal waters are also piped directly to your bathtub, so you can soak in the personal comfort of your own room. At the private deck I put my feet up, watching lotuses bloom and river reeds sway in the breeze. Blessed with a serene natural ambience, Garut holds the charm of a land meant for indolent lotus-eaters.

There’s much to see and do here. Our young guide Dede Sunandar recounted how the Papandayan volcano was West Java’s biggest draw besides the Cipanas hot springs and the 8th century Shaivite shrine of Candi Cangkuan. Adventure seekers head to the mountainous tracts of Papandayan, Haruman and Guntur for trekking trails.

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The Papandayan volcano has the largest caldera in South East Asia after Bromo, which along with Tangkuban Perahu are counted amont the most famous volcanoes in Java. The numerous craters in Papandayan are fascinating. Some spit out hot mud, some are hissing noisy gas craters, there are golden craters that resemble gold… its rocks covered in golden yellow sulphurous emissions.

With a population of almost 3 million, most people in Garut Regency practice farming. “People say that the population is high because the weather is so cold. Couples are forced to keep themselves warm in this climate, hence the baby boom,” Dede winked.

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Jawa Barat (West Java) was once a Portuguese trading outpost and Garut has a charming colonial legacy called Delman. The quaint horse wagons, locally called dokarandong or sado, are named after a Dutchman called Dellemann, who introduced this cart to the people. Over time, his name got corrupted to Delman and became a popular, fun means of transport!

We drove past the river Chi Aren which empties into the sea. Our guide revealed that another popular local tradition is ram fights, organised in the villages on holidays. “So popular is this sport, you think the men look after their rams better than their wives and children,” he quipped.

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Beautiful batik

Batik is an Indonesian heritage, designated by UNESCO as a Masterpiece of Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity. And Garut is a great place to learn more about it. Garut’s batik has been world famous since the time of Dutch rule. Characterized by earthy hues like white in combination with purple, dark blue, brown and other colors, the technique of resist painting uses wax on the fabric.

Part of the fabric is covered with malam (beeswax) and a bamboo spout or nib called canting is used to ‘paint’ hot wax with lines or dots onto the cloth which creates a resist pattern. The other method is to use a designed copper block or dye stamp called “cap” and “print” the resist on the fabric. The fabric is then coloured in various shades using this method and the portions with the wax can be melted off by dipping in hot water.

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At Pajagan Rasya Batik Garutan, a batik expert was busy at work, dipping her bamboo canting, blowing it gently and drawing flawless designs on a large ream of cloth. Inside the workshop, we saw them dunk and dye the cloth and boil it to melt the wax before letting it dry in the open. At the shop, we all ended up buying the lovely batik items on display – shawls and stoles, shirts and tunics, even fabric to stitch later! The hand-painted ones were pricier but the printed ones were very reasonable. 

The Batik Museum in Yogyakarta outlines how various cultures have influenced Batik designs. The status of batik grew in 17th century when Sultan Agung of Mataram chose to dress in batik clothes and accorded it importance in ceremonial use. Traditional batik used a lot of browns, yellows and reds or dark earthy hues. Whereas, batik in the coast especially North Java has more vibrant, brighter, tropical colours. A framed panel displayed how every design motif and colour was attributed to a distinct region or theme!

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Leather is the other trademark in Garut, and Sukaregang is the place to pick up the finest leather products. Rows of shops and boutiques display a wide range of leather goods made from the soft hide of local sheep.

From wallets and bracelets to handbags, satchels and jackets in every shade, the exclusive designs sell at outrageous prices in fashion capitals. A prominent silk-producing area, Garut is also known for traditional Ikat weaving where strands of dyed weft and warp threads are handwoven on a loom. 

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Garut’s Good ol’ Dodol

Indonesians have a sweet tooth and you get a taste of it at the sprawling Picnic factory in Garut. Dodol, a brown chewy caramel sweet, is Indonesia’s signature confection, and the brand Picnic has been synonymous with it for decades. For generations, dodol was prepared in homes, but Iton Damiri began manufacturing Dodol in 1949 on a commercial scale.

When Damiri tried to sell his homemade dodol under its original name Halima and later Fatimah at a popular elite store named Picnic in Bandung, the owner wasn’t interested. Damiri rebranded his product as Picnic to woo the shop owner and the rest is history! In 1979, the Picnic Dodol factory was established with only five people. Right now, they have 250 workers who churn out four to six tons of Dodol per day! 

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The main ingredient is sticky or glutinous rice (badvas katang) or rice powder which is used in combination with brown sugar, coconut milk and grated coconut. It takes 9-10 hours to cook with constant stirring before it is cooled and allowed to set for a couple of hours. Initially, dodol had only one flavour, but market innovation and the need to keep up with changing trends, has seen dodol acquire a range of assorted flavours. Today there are fruit-based and nut-based dodol along with flavours like chocolate or coffee, garnishes like sesame and dodol brownies, pies and cookies. 

After a quick guided tour around the factory and a short historical film on Dodol, we headed straight to the shop to tuck in, literally like kids in a candy store! They don’t export it… so we picked up assorted flavours as sweet Indonesian food souvenirs called ‘olah oleh’! We returned to Bandung and picked up some bamboo souvenirs and angklungs, the sweet taste of dodol still on our lips.

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FACT FILE

Getting there: Fly from Bangalore via Kuala Lumpur to Bandung on Malindo Air. From Bandung, drive 130km south/4hrs to Garut.

Where to Stay
Sumber Alam, Garden of Water
Jln. Raya Cipanas 122 Garut, Jawa Barat, Indonesia
Ph: +0262 237700 W: www.sumberalamresort.com 

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What to buy

Batik – Rasya Batik in Garut
JI, Otto Iskandardinata, Komplek PLN No. 1, Garut, Jawa Barat
Ph: 0262 232824 email: rasya.batik@yahoo.com

Dodol – Picnic Dodol Garut Factory
JI, Pasundan 102, Garut 1, Garut Kota, Jawa Barat
Ph: 0262 240717 W: www.picnicdodolgarut.com

Bamboo souvenirs & angklungs – Saung Angklung Udjo
Jl. Padasuka No.118, Cibeunying Kidul, Kota Bandung, Jawa Barat, Indonesia
Ph: 0262 227271714 W: http://www.angklung-udjo.co.id

For more info, visit https://www.indonesia.travel/

Author: Priya Ganapathy. This article appeared on 4 January, 2019 in Indulge, the Friday supplement of The New Indian Express newspaper.

The Jungfrau region: An artistic refuge

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Few know how the epic landscapes of Switzerland’s Jungfrau region inspired the literary legacy of Goethe and Tolkien, besides the spirit of adventure, discover ANURAG MALLICK and PRIYA GANAPATHY

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For a country of hills and vales typified through the folkloric tales of William Tell and Heidi, it might come as a surprise to many that Switzerland is also the inspiration behind JRR Tolkein’s ‘Rivendell’. While New Zealand may have served as the shooting locale for the Lord of the Rings saga, it was the Swiss Alps in the Bernese Oberland (highlands of Bern Canton) that provided literary stimulus. In a letter written to his son in the 1950’s, Tolkien acknowledged that the Hobbit Bilbo Baggins’ journey to the other side of the ‘Misty Mountains’ was based on his own Swiss adventures in 1911.

As part of a group of 12, with his brother Hillary and friends, a 19-year-old Tolkien travelled on foot from Interlaken to Lauterbrunnen by mountain paths to the head of the valley, eastward over the two high passes Kleine and Grosse Scheidegge to Grindelwald and eventually Merringen. They continued over the Grimsel Pass through Upper Valais to Brig, the Aletsch Glacier and finished up in Zermatt and the Matterhorn. A new walking tour ‘There and Back Again’, retraces the 290km walking route, though we were content to follow most of the journey by train.

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The Bernese Oberland was the first place of mass tourism in Switzerland. British schoolboys came here for a break in the 1830s after finishing school. Before getting the world to travel, the first trip Thomas Cook ever took was to Interlaken in 1863. German composers Wagner and Mendelssohn, Mark Twain, Ted Roosevelt and a host of climbers came here. In 1874, the Bodeli Railway carried the first travelers from across the world to the Custom House, as Interlaken Ost was then called. With the opening of the Bernese Oberland Railway in 1890 and a ship jetty in 1891, tourism boomed.

After watching Deep Purple and local hero Gola at the Snowpenair Concert at Kleine Scheidegg few years ago courtesy Jungfrau Railways, we were here for another spectacular event. Golfing sensation and Omega brand ambassador Rory McIlroy was teeing off at the 22 km long Aletsch Glacier, the longest glacier in the Alps which ran to a depth of one mile, at Jungfraujoch, the Top of Europe.

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We reached Interlaken Ost and took a connecting train to our base Grindelwald where we checked into Sunstar Hotels. Cradled at the base of the jagged north face of the Eiger, it overlooked the Snowpark Grindelwald First. Gondolas transported tourists to Schreckfeld and First for the thrill of ziplining down the First Flyer and First Glider, the new Cliff Walk by Tissot and the hour’s hike to the pristine mountain lake Bachalpsee, besides other adventures like Mountain Cart and Trotti Bikes.

It was the annual festival day so Grindelwald’s main avenue had been blocked with makeshift stalls selling handicrafts, local wines, winter wear and food. We grabbed a bratwurst and some churros before boarding a train to Wilderswil, from where the Schynige Platte Bahn took us on a steep 7.2 km ride on a cogwheel-railway track climbing 1400m to the famous alpine wildflower gardens of Schynige Platte. Built in 1893, this mountain railway completed 125 years this year.

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Man and machine seemed in harmony with nature as the locomotives bore names of alpine flowers. We were riding No.19 ‘Fluhblume’. Visitors can see nearly 600 species of plants and two thirds of all the flowers in the Alps on a circuit that’s only a kilometer long. Sometimes jet-black, sometimes silver in the evening sun after a thunderstorm, the plates of slate gleam from afar, giving Schynige Platte its name.

The train halted at Breitlauenen and we admired the view at Ferdinand Hodler lookout point, where one of the best-known Swiss painters of the nineteenth century sat to paint. His piece ‘The Woodcutter’ featured on the 50 Swiss Franc note. We were lucky to get some fresh feathery snowfall on the train ride winding through tunnels and a landscape blanketed in white.

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Two huge picture frames encourage visitors to capture the trio of mountains but the clouds masked the majestic view of the Jungfrau, Eiger and Monch. At Berghotel Schynige Platte we enjoyed a typical Swiss meal of goulash, Wilderer rosti with venison and Alpler rosti or hash browns with pan fried sausage and onion sauce.

Over 200 years ago, as the first visitors travelled to the Bernese Oberland, the Schynige Platte was already a favourite among the wealthy upper class. People thronged grand hotels in Interlaken besides inns and guesthouses in villages and valleys, driven by the maxim ‘up into the mountains, to the summits’. The hike from Schynige Platte to the Faulhorn and Grosse Scheidegg was a classic, done by day or moonlight. Back then, the train ‘saved four to five hours of walk and a cost of 20 to 25 francs for beasts of burden.’

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Early travel journals noted how the Jungfrau always seemed inaccessible and untouchable, hence its name Jungfrau (the maiden or virgin). In 1811 Jungfrau was scaled and the golden age of Alpine mountaineering culminated in the ascent of Eiger’s north face in 1933. But like people, even the trains had learned to climb. Adolf Guyer-Zeller envisioned the historic Jungfrau Railways, tunneling 7.2km through the Eiger and Monch to reach Europe’s highest railway station Jungfraujoch.

In 2001, the Jungfrau-Aletsch-Bietschhorn region became the first area of outstanding natural beauty in Switzerland together with the Alpine region to be recognized by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site. Today, one million visitors flock to the Top of Europe to delight in its snowy pleasures.

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From Alpine Sensation, Ice Palace, Sphinx observatory (reached by the fastest lift in Switzerland) to Swiss Chocolate Heaven by chocolatier Lindt, there’s lots to explore. Braving winds for a selfie with the Swiss flag at the Plateau, tourists shriek in delight as they go sledding or whooshing down the 250-m long zipline. The year-round accessibility only adds to the destination’s popularity.

Yet, the Jungfrau region is dotted with smaller villages that retain their rustic charm. From Kleine Scheidegg, we took the Wengernalp Bahn past the ‘pedestrian only’ village of Wengen to Lauterbrunnen, dubbed as the Valley with 72 glacial waterfalls. Well-fed Swiss cows munched on sweet-smelling Alpine grass, their tinkling bells forming a constant soundtrack. As the train took the final turn across the bridge, we got a magical view of the church and Staubbach Falls.

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The earliest travel guide to the Lauterbrunnen valley was published in 1768 by Bernese publisher Abraham Wager featuring illustrations by Swiss painter Caspar Wolf. It was a 45min walk from the train station to the base of the fall past pretty chalets and Horner ‘the best pub in town because we are the only one’. The cataract plummeted from a lofty 297 m in a misty spray – it was first measured on 28 July 1776. Like us, many painters, writers and travelers were captivated by its beauty.

Poet and composer Johann Wolfgang Goethe toured the Lauterbrunnen valley in 1779 with Duke Karl August von Weimar. The sight of Staubbach Falls delighted him so much that he called it a ‘most wonderful thing’ and wrote his poem “Song of the Spirits over the waters”. In his travel diary dated Sep 1816, Lord Byron noted how the sun made a rainbow in the waterfall. “I have never seen anything like it. It looked just like a rainbow, which came down for a visit, and was so near that one could just step into it.”

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One look at the scenery and Tolkien’s description of Rivendell came to life. Cascading waterfalls and a loud river that overlooked the three ‘Misty Mountain Peaks’ were no doubt based on Jungfrau, Monch and Eiger. The mines of Moria were inspired by the construction of the Jungfraubahn, which was being finished when Tolkien visited in 1911.

We learnt ‘Orc’ is a local name for a demon and how a picture postcard of a painting Der Berggeist (the mountain spirit) by German artist J Madlener depicting an old man with a white flowing beard wearing a wide brimmed hat and a long cloak, was the origin of Gandalf. We couldn’t agree more with Tolkien’s words – “I left the view of the Jungfrau with great regret – eternal snow etched as it seems against eternal sunshine.”

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FACT FILE

Getting there
Fly Swiss from Mumbai to Zürich International Airport (8 hr 55 min). Board an SBB (Swiss Federal Railways) train to Bern (1 hr 20 min) and take the connecting train to Interlaken Ost (54 min). www.swiss.com www.SwissTravelSystem.com

Getting Around
Berner Oberland Bahn (BOB) from Interlaken Ost to Grindelwald station provides the first stage of mountain railway routes. Wengernalpbahn (WAB) and Jungfraubahn (JB) to, Lauterbrunnen, Wengen, Kleine Scheidegg and Europe’s highest station at Jungfraujoch. A 3-day Jungfrau VIP pass with unlimited travel costs CHF 235 (available from 1 May-26 Oct at all stations). www.jungfrau.ch

Where to Stay
Carlton Europa, Interlaken
Sunstar Hotels, Grindelwald
Berghotel Schynige Platte
Oberland, Lauterbrunnen

Things to Do
Jungfraubahn to Jungfraujoch Top of Europe
First Flyer, First Glider, Tissot Cliff Walk, Mountain Cart
Alpine Garden at Schynige Platte
Hike from First to Bachalpsee
Walk to Staubbach waterfall in Lauterbrunnen
Harderbahn Funicular from Interlaken to Harder Kulm
BLS boat cruise on Lake Thun and Lake Brienz

For more info, visit www.myswitzerland.com

Authors: Anurag Mallick & Priya Ganapathy. This article appeared on 30 Nov, 2018 in Indulge, the Friday lifestyle supplement of The New Indian Express newspaper.

 

Kigali: In the Land of a Thousand Hills

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With direct flights by RwandAir from Mumbai to Kigali, Rwanda’s vibrant capital has never seemed so attractive; ANURAG MALLICK and PRIYA GANAPATHY take a Go Kigali city tour to experience its local sights, markets and cuisine 

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We flew out on Rwand Air and discovered that it takes less time to get to the Rwandan capital Kigali from Mumbai than driving to Ratnagiri. With a direct connection four times a week, more travellers are discovering the wonders of this tiny yet remarkable country in East Africa.

Rwanda is one of the world’s last refuges of the mountain gorilla and the invitation to Kwita Izina 2018, a naming ceremony for baby gorillas born the previous year, was irresistible. We made the most of our time in Kigali before the official program. Jullesse, the Rwandan Development Board representative greeted us warmly at the airport and highlighted the city’s landmarks en route to our hotel.

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“That building decked up in colourful lights is the Kigali Convention Centre, often lit up in the colours of the visiting head of state.” When Indian PM Modi visited Rwanda in July this year, it wore the hues of the Indian tricolour. Modi also donated 200 cows to villagers at Rweru under President Paul Kagame’s Girinka program (literally ‘May you have a cow’ in the local Kinyarwanda dialect) where every poor family receives one cow for sustenance. In a country where cows are held in high regard, this gesture won lots of Rwandan hearts.

We soon reached the swanky Kigali Marriott Hotel, which opened two years ago, one of the first international chains with a presence in Rwanda. Inside the massive executive suite, a personalized note, macaroons and a dry fruit platter awaited us. The view from the balcony was stupendous.

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A ‘no photography’ sign on the glass door was bewildering. The steward quickly explained that the hotel faced the high-security presidential quarters! On the other side were a line of embassies, leaving us chuffed to be staying in the posh diplomatic enclave of Kiyovu in the CBD (Central Business District).

Sauntering downstairs to Soko restaurant (literally ‘market’), we admired the entire wall decorated with traditional woven agasake baskets. Besides a massive spread we were intrigued to find faratas and chickpeas in their dedicated African breakfast corner! Rwanda has many Indian settlers who influenced the local cuisine. We tried the local staple kaunga (steamed corn stew) and matoke (green banana and beef stew).

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It was surprising to learn that Kigali was founded only as recently as 1907 by German explorer and administrator Richard Kandt. His house, now a museum, was just a short walk away. Strolling past the local moto taxi stand (bike taxis like Goa) and the gorilla statue opposite Kigali City Hall, we reached what was the first European-style house in the city.

In the colonial ‘Scramble for Africa’ in late 19th century, Germany established a presence in Rwanda by forming an alliance with King Yuhi V Musinga in 1897. Kandt arrived in 1899 while exploring Lake Kivu in search of the source of the river Nile. In 1907 Germany separated the administration of Rwanda-Burundi and Kandt was appointed the country’s first resident. He moved the administrative headquarters from the King’s Palace in Nyanza to a more central location. Reaching this large hilly tract, he called it Kigali, literally ‘expansive’. The name rang true as we looked at the city stretching around a chain of hills!

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Kandt built the first brick house in town at Nyarugenge, which had great weather and afforded good views. It became a Museum of Natural History but all the exhibits had been moved out except the lone baby crocodile in a pool and a collection of snakes in a small enclosure at the back.

The building presently serves as the Kandt House Museum outlining Rwanda’s colonial history and culture. It was Kandt who first allowed the entry of Indian and Swahili traders into the country in 1908. During this period, Kigali had a population of 2000 with 420 foreigners, mostly Arabs and Indians, besides 9 Germans!

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During World War I, Belgium took control of Rwanda-Burundi in 1916 and it wasn’t until 1962 that Kigali became the capital upon Rwandan independence. In April 1994, President Habyarimana’s plane was shot down near Kigali Airport, triggering the Rwandan genocide, where nearly a million people, mostly Tutsi and moderate Hutus were brutally murdered in premeditated attacks by the interim government.

The Kigali Genocide Memorial is a moving reminder of Rwanda’s tragic past, where locals often come to be reunited with their loved ones. Rwanda celebrates the 25th anniversary of the genocide in 2019 and April 7 is observed by the United Nations as the Day of Remembrance of the victims.

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We stopped by at Kigali’s iconic hotel, Hôtel des Mille Collines, named after the Belgian appellation for Rwanda during colonial rule – ‘Pays des Mille Collines’ (Land of a Thousand Hills). It became famous after 1,268 people took refuge here during the 1994 Rwandan Genocide. The story of the hotel and its manager Paul Rusesabagina (played by Don Cheadle) was immortalized in the film Hotel Rwanda.

It was unbelievable that the country had emerged from the Dark Ages in the late-90s into what is its Golden Age of development. It is a gritty story of healing, forgiveness and coming to terms with their past to build a better future. Today, Rwanda is one of the cleanest countries in Africa and Kigali is so clean, you could literally eat off the wide pavement-lined avenues!

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The last Saturday of every month is dedicated to community service work called Umuganda when the whole society comes together to clean or rebuild. Rwanda is also the safest country in Africa for women and the ease of doing business has been streamlined by merging all nodal agencies into RDB (Rwanda Development Board). You can open a business within 24 hours of landing here!

Back at Kigali Marriott we grabbed some ‘Question Coffee’ from a women’s co-operative at the Iriba Bar & Terrace and fried sambaza (local fish) sourced from Lake Kivu and brochettes (skewered meat cubes with roasted ibirayi or Irish potatoes). Interestingly, German soldiers and Belgian missionaries brought the potato to Rwanda in early 20th century and ibirayi is derived from uburayi meaning ‘that which comes from Europe’! After a relaxing Dead Sea mud therapy at the spa we whiled away the evening happy hours at the posh Executive Lounge.

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The hotel has special Indian, Asian and African theme nights, besides wine tastings and live jazz but we savoured some gnocchi and baked captain fish at their Italian restaurant Cucina. Our friend from an earlier trip to Zambia, Davidson Mugisha of Wildlife Tours Rwanda dropped by to show us a bit of Kigali’s legendary nightlife, as we barhopped from Riders at Kigali Heights to Fuchsia Lounge.

Kigali Marriott has an outlet of Go Kigali, which organizes local city tours and we set off on a half-day excursion the next day. The small boutique also stocks lovely handmade products sourced from all over Africa. Led by our friendly guide Colombe, we headed to Mount Kigali for a panoramic view over town. The pine forests were serene except for a troupe of furtive blue-balled Vervet monkeys.

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Our next stop was the Gaddafi Mosque, home to the Islamic Centre and a place of refuge during the genocide. Libyan leader Col Muammar Gaddafi was a popular figure here and roads, mosques and bakeries were named after him. Southwest of CBD, the suburb of Nyamirambo was the second part of the city to be settled. Belgian colonists established it in the 1920s for civil servants and Muslim Swahili traders.

Though most of the country follows Christianity, Nyamirambo is the Muslim Quarter. Masjid al-Fatah, better known as the Green Mosque, is the oldest mosque in town, dating back to the 1930s. With its busy nightlife and hip hangouts, Nyamirambo is hailed as the coolest neighbourhood in Kigali.

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We trawled local milk bars, cafes, mural walks and markets like Kimironko where Colombe taught us how to eat tree tomato and passion fruit like locals as we marveled at the rows of baskets heaped with rainbow-hued beans. We ended our tour with a traditional meal at Tamu Tamu – ugali (cassava porridge), stewed cassava leaves, goat curry, fish and aubergine curry, beef pilao, avocado and beans.

That evening we dropped by at Ikaze, a boutique for traditional Rwandan handicrafts and discovered little treasures to take home. We bought some more agasake peace baskets; symbolic of this tiny nation driven by the philosophy of ubumuntu or ‘greatness of heart’, teaching the world about the values of forgiveness, humanity and compassion.

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FACT FILE 

Getting there
The national carrier Rwand Air flies direct from Mumbai to Kigali in 7 hrs four times a week (Mon, Wed, Fri, Sat). www.rwandair.com

Where to Stay
Kigali Marriott Hotel www.marriott.com
Kigali Serena Hotel www.serenahotels.com
Hôtel des Milles Collines www.millecollines.rw/
Ubumwe Grande Hotel www.ubumwegrandehotel.com/

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Must Do
City tour with Go Kigali Tours, $60/person 9:30am-1pm, 2-6pm
Pay your respect at Kigali Genocide Memorial
Try the local ‘Question’ Coffee and Rwandan tea, besides local beers like Mutzig, Primus and Virunga
Feast on Rwandan cuisine at Tamu Tamu restaurant
Shop for agasake and souvenirs at Ikaze & Kimironko Market
Clubbing at Riders, Fuchsia, Coco Bean, Envy, K Club, Bougainvilla
Gorilla trekking with Wildlife Tours Rwanda www.wildlifetours-rwanda.com

For more info, www.visitrwanda.com

Authors: Anurag Mallick & Priya Ganapathy. This is the unabridged version of the article that appeared on 3 Nov, 2018 in HT City, Hindustan Times newspaper.  

Victoria Falls: The Smoke That Thunders

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From the mighty Zambezi River thundering down to form the famous Victoria Falls to heritage trains, petting lions and helicopter rides above the falls, Livingstone in Southern Zambia is a traveller’s paradise, discover ANURAG MALLICK & PRIYA GANAPATHY

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As our 30-seater Mahogany Air twin-turboprop approached Harry Nkambule International Airport at Livingstone, we could see a giant mist hanging in the air over the lush green landscape. “That’s Victoria Falls,” smiled the amiable steward, quite used to seeing passengers agape. The gush of water is so much, the rising mist can be seen from miles, hence its local name ‘Mosi-oa-tunya’ or The Smoke that Thunders. A UNESCO World Heritage site, Vic Falls as it’s popularly known, ranks among the seven natural wonders of the world – and the only one in Africa.

Incidentally, the first European to stumble upon the Zambezi river in January 1498 was Vasco da Gama, who disembarked at a point he named Rio dos Bons Sinais (River of Good Omens). Centuries later explorer David Livingstone became the first westerner to see the Mosi-oa-Tunya. He first heard of the great waterfall in 1851 and finally visited it in 1855.

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He came down the Zambezi in a canoe, camped on Kalai Island a few kilometers upstream and set off in a small dugout to approach the thunderous smoke. He landed on the biggest island on the lip of the waterfall (named Livingstone Island after him) from where he got the first view of the fall.

He later wrote, “It was the most wonderful sight I had witnessed in Africa. It had never been seen before by European eyes, but scenes so lovely must have been gazed upon by angels in their flight.” Our first glimpse of the hanging mist from the air did seem a lot like that.

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It was a short drive from the airport to Avani Victoria Falls Resort, located just a 5-minute walk from the cataract. The sprawling resort came within the Mosi-oa-Tunya National Park, which ensured chance encounters with wildlife like giraffes, antelopes and the odd zebra crossing!

Decked up in contemporary Zambian designs, the adobe-style rooms overlooked a lawn strewn with contemporary metal figurines of rhinos and ostriches. One could pre-book an African open-air Boma dinner with traditional dances, though we happily devoured a mixed meat Zambezi Platter by the pool.

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Hotel guests of Avani have the unique privilege of unlimited complimentary access to the waterfall and we decided to make the most of it. Following the crashing sound of water, we exited from the back gate and stopped for souvenirs at the small market right opposite the waterfall entrance.

Local artists carved exquisite sculptures from locally available verdite, better known as ‘mosi oa tunya’ stone. Some were carving soap dishes with half submerged hippos; others family of giraffes. Another popular pick-me-up, the Nyami Nyami pendant, made of soapstone, wood or bone, has a fascinating legend.

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The indigenous Tonga tribesmen believe that the Zambezi is home to a fierce river god called Nyami Nyami. The mythical creature is believed to live under a large rock near Kariba gorge, near Victoria Falls. Ever since the dam was built, he was separated from his wife and unleashed his fury through floods, thunder and rain.

The locals tried to calm the spirit through sacrifice and continue to craft the pendant as a good luck charm for visitors. “This is the face of the creature – half snake, half fish, these notches resemble the waterfall and this hole is the eye of the fall,” explained a sculptor. We picked up a few and walked through the gate along a stone pathway.

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There were several trails branching out and we took the rightmost one for a walk upstream, which led to the top of the waterfall. The river flowed gently, nonchalantly disappearing from view over the cliff offering no clue about the drama below. We retraced our steps and paid tribute at the War Memorial in memory of Northern Rhodesians who lost their lives during the First World War.

Nearby stood a large statue of Dr David Livingstone, erected in 2005 to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the first European sighting of Victoria Falls on 16 November 1855 and to commemorate the centenary of the founding of the town of Livingstone. On his 1852-56 exploration of the African hinterland, Dr Livingstone mapped out almost the entire course of the river.

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We walked down the stone path and with each step the crash grew louder. And then through a clearing we saw it for the first time – the mighty Zambezi river thundering 360ft down the 1,708 m wide gorge. The volume of water was so much that the famous Devil’s Pool on the edge of the waterfall was out of bounds. Yet, there were other trails to Boiling Pot (615m) and the scenic Photographic Trail (788m) that were accessible.

As we approached the Knife Edge Bridge, the gentle spray turned into a full downpour. Our rain jackets were modest protection from the torrential splash. Built in 1968 by PWD, the 40m long 1.3m wide bridge connects the mainland to the headland. We continued to Danger Point for a view of Victoria Falls Bridge. The bridge was a crucial link in the route of the railway, as envisioned by Cecil John Rhodes. The bridge was assembled in sections at the Cleveland Bridge Company factory yard in Darlington before being shipped to Africa.

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The steam engine ‘Princess of Mulobezi’ originally hauled timber for Zambezi Sawmills nearly a century ago. Today, it chugged along the scenic tracks with passengers. We had a brief peek into the plush Royal Livingstone Express in town and continued to the Victoria Falls Bridge. Rhodes had wished “I should like to have the spray of the water of the Victoria Falls over the carriages,” and boy did his dream come true.

We felt the spray as soon we got off the tour bus and walked towards the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe. The waterfalls were a shared legacy between the two countries and we watched the Zambezi river down below flow towards Zimbabwe. Bang in the middle of the bridge adventure seekers could try the bungee jump over the Zambezi gorge.

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Livingstone has no dearth of adventure. Batoka Sky offer helicopter and microlight rides above the falls. At Mukuni Big 5 you can experience elephant feeding, a walk with cheetahs and lion petting. At the Cultural Centre, there’s vigorous Zambian dances in traditional costumes. The Livingstone Museum, the oldest and largest museum in Zambia, showcases the history of early man, the country and its traditions besides a gallery dedicated to explorer Dr David Livingstone.

Back at our hotel, we dropped by at the adjacent Royal Livingstone Hotel By Anantara. A heady mix of Victorian elegance and old world colonial ambience, the classy resort was filled with paintings and antiques. Wooden decks amid sprawling gardens and towering trees offered sweeping views of the Zambezi, with signature therapies like Zambezi Massage in riverside gazebos.

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It was evening and we headed to Aha The David Livingstone Safari Lodge & Spa, a plush resort made of stone, thatch and wood. The high-roofed foyer was decorated with granaries, drums, cane lamps and African portraits on adobe walls with luxurious spa treatments and Afro-Arabian fusion cuisine at Kalai restaurant. At the pier, we boarded the Lady Livingstone for a magical 2-hr sundowner cruise on the Zambezi river.

A band playing on the silimba (Zambian xylophone using resonating gourds) and we sipped sundowners while training our binocs to the riverbank to spot crocs, hippos and other wildlife. The steward presented us a chilled pint of the local Mosi lager. The label called it ‘thunderous refreshment as mighty as the Mosi-oa-Tunya’. The rising mist from Vic Falls danced like a fairy and we watched the sun slowly sink into the Zambezi, as if it was swallowed whole by Nyami Nyami…

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FACT FILE

Getting there
Fly to Lusaka on Ethiopian Airlines via Addis Ababa, Kenyan Airlines via Nairobi, Oman Air via Muscat or Emirates via Dubai. Mahogany Air (Ph +26 097 786 5838 www.mahoganyair.com) flies from Lusaka to Harry Nkambule International Airport at Livingstone.

What to Do

Royal Livingtone Express
Shearwater Victoria Falls Bungee
Mukuni Big 5 Ph +260 213 322286 mukunibig5.co.zm
Livingstone Museum (Mon-Sun 9am-4:30pm Entry $5)
Batoka Sky Microlight & Helicopter Flights

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Where to Stay

Avani Victoria Falls Resort
Ph +260 978 777044
www.minorhotels.com

Royal Livingstone Hotel by Anantara
Ph +260 21 332 1122
https://www.anantara.com/en/royal-livingstone
Tariff $414 upwards

Aha The David Livingstone Safari Lodge & Spa
Ph +260 21 332 4601
https://aha.co.za/david-livingstone/
Tariff $370

For more info, visit http://www.zambia.travel

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Authors: Anurag Mallick & Priya Ganapathy. This article appeared on 20 Oct 2018 in the HT City supplement of Hindustan Times newspaper.

Lusaka: The heart of Zambia

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Known as Africa’s City of Peace, Lusaka is fast emerging as a tourism hub. Interesting cultural experiences, wild encounters and a vibrant nightlife can be found in the Zambian capital, write ANURAG MALLICK and PRIYA GANAPATHY

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Sitting around a stone table in a dim-lit grotto with the soft gurgle of an indoor waterfall, we sipped white wine and nibbled on an assorted cheese platter. We were at Kaposhi Dairy in the 10,000-acre Chaminuka Farm on the outskirts of Zambia’s capital Lusaka, where an hour earlier we had petted cheetahs and admired the Chaminuka art collection.

Another night we moved from live jazz at Misty’s to bar-hopping at Chicago and Kegs & Lions, ending at Kalahari where a local band and dancers rocked late into the night and random strangers got on stage to bump and grind for dangerously close face-offs.

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Lusaka is one of the fastest developing cities in southern Africa and one can see why. Named after the headman of an erstwhile Lenje village on Manda Hill (manda means graveyard), Lusaka is perched atop a 4,198 feet high limestone plateau that blesses it with great weather.

Its strategic location at the junction of the Great North Road to Tanzania and the Great East Road to Malawi made it the natural choice as capital of the British colony of Northern Rhodesia. A section of the Great North Road was named Cairo Road in memory of British mining magnate and politician Cecil Rhodes’ vision of a road from Cape to Cairo through British colonies in Africa.

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In 1950, Ralph Sanders, a colonial civil servant working for the department of Game and Tsetse Control founded a Botanical Garden. He called it Munda Wanga or ‘My Garden’ in the local Nyanja dialect. As a botanist he was responsible for the establishment of many parks, gardens and the beautiful tree-lined avenues in Lusaka. Yet, wherever we drove around, we spotted painted signs of boring and drilling companies from China and India.

For years, European powers vied for control over the mineral-rich Copper Belt to the north. Dubbed as ‘red gold’, copper shaped the country’s infrastructural development, spurred trade unions and birthed Zambian nationalism. They say Zambia was born with a ‘copper spoon in its mouth’. Thanks to the freedom struggle spearheaded by Dr Kenneth Kaunda, Zambia gained independence on 24 December 1964. The international airport named after the first President Kaunda is currently undergoing a major expansion with Chinese collaboration.

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We visited Chilenje House No. 394 where Dr Kenneth Kaunda lived between January 1960 and December 1962. From this humble house, he directed Zambia’s freedom struggle, triggering independence movements in Southern Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) and Nyasaland (Malawi). House No. 395 contains simple relics and chronicles the history and growth of Lusaka and Zambia’s political development. For more on the country’s history, the National Museum is the perfect resource. As the venue for several historic conventions, Lusaka is often hailed as Africa’s ‘City of Peace’.

The next stop Embassy Park Presidential Memorial is a mausoleum where late Zambian presidents Levy Patrick Mwanawasa (1948–2008), Frederick Chiluba (1943–2011) and Michael Sata (1937–2014) are buried. The US$15 entry fee is steep but includes a guided tour that describes its architectural highlights. Photography of the building across the main road, a former parliament building and now used by the Ministry of Defence, is prohibited. Interestingly, while these gentlemen had died in office, Zambia’s first President is still alive and well.

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Lusaka has a vibrant nightlife with several places to wine and dine. The historic Lusaka Golf Club serves excellent steak. Musuku restaurant at Southern Sun Ridgeway dishes out terrific Zambian fare including wild game meat like kudu, croc and impala, as does Chuma Grill at Radisson Blu.

Rembrandt at the Great Best Western offers the local staple nshima (finely ground maize flour porridge) and Zambezi bream, fresh from the river. Taj Pamodzi, where the Indian President Shri Ramnath Kovind had stayed during his recent visit, has a lovely bar called Marula and a rustic open-air restaurant Steaks and Grills rustling up Indian and Zambian grills.

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For shopping, head straight to Kabwata Cultural Village, an amorphous open-air market of thatch-roofed huts and makeshift stalls where you can buy stone and wood carvings, baskets, antique masks, drums, colorful clothes and more, directly from the artisans. Also worth a look is the Sunday Craft Market, a weekly affair in the car park of Arcades Shopping Centre on Great East Road.

It’s a great place to strike a bargain with a wide range of colourful handicrafts, wooden bowls, malachite figurines, African prints and masks. For a shopping mall experience, try the massive Manda Hill, East Park or Levy Junction.

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Yet, many of Lusaka’s top tourist hotspots are located not within the city but on the outskirts. Set in Lilayi Lodge’s 650-hectare game farm, the Lilayi Elephant Nursery is where orphaned elephants and abandoned calves are nursed before being rehabilitated to a Release Facility at Kafue National Park, 4 hours away. The project manager gave us an overview and showed us the backroom facility where formula milk was prepared for the young pachyderms.

Many calves like Nkala, Rufunsa, Maramba, Zambezi, Mosi-oa-Tunya and Kavalamanja were named after their place of discovery and had been released at Kafue. Each one had a heart-rending story. Musolele was named after the wildlife police officer who died defending his mother from poachers.

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Mulisani, literally ‘shepherd’, was named in honour of wildlife conservationist and artist David Shepherd. Njanji means ‘train tracks’ as this elephant was found on the railway line after being darted. In what’s a daily ritual, at 11.30am, we were ushered to a high viewing deck to watch them feed and play.

Soon, it was time for us to forage as well and Lilayi Lodge gave us our best meal in Lusaka – char-grilled rump steak, grilled Zambian crayfish and East African seafood curry. We shuffled heavily back to our vehicle for the hour’s ride to Lusaka. Bent over our padded waistlines, we laboriously packed our souvenirs, noticing how it wasn’t the only excess baggage we carried…

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FACT FILE

Getting there
Fly to Lusaka’s Kenneth Kaunda International Airport on Ethiopian Airlines via Addis Ababa, Kenyan Airlines via Nairobi, Oman Air via Muscat or Emirates via Dubai. Lilayi and Chaminuka are on the outskirts of Lusaka, 45 min drive away.

Stay
Southern Sun Ridgeway
Ph +260 211 251 666
www.tsogosun.com

Best Western Plus Lusaka Grand Hotel
Ph +260 21 1239666
www.lusakagrand.co.zm

Protea Hotels by Marriott
Ph +260 21 1254664
https://www.marriott.com

Radisson Blu Hotel
Ph +260 960 280900
www.radissonblu.com

Taj Pamodzi
Ph +260 21 1254455
https://vivanta.tajhotels.com

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Nature/Wildlife
Chaminuka
Ph +260 211 254146, 840884
www.chaminuka.com

Lilayi Elephant Nursery & Lodge
Ph +260 211 840435/6, 971 00 2010 http://www.lilayi.com
http://gamerangersinternational.org/

Must Eat
Steaks at Lusaka Golf Club
Zambian cuisine at Musuku, Chuma Grill & Steaks and Grills
Nshima & Zambezi bream at Rembrandt
Fried Chicken at Hungry Lion
Pizza at Debonnairs
Indian food at Bombay Lounge

Buy
Masks, wood & stone carvings Kabwata Cultural Centre
Local crafts at Sunday Market, Arcades car park
Malls like Manda Hill, East Park, Arcades & Levy Junction

Nightspots
Live jazz at Misty
Local Zambian music at Kalahari
Bars like Chicago’s, Keg & Lion and Alpha
Late night at Kabwata

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Authors: Anurag Mallick & Priya Ganapathy. This article appeared on 20 Oct 2018 in the Travel supplement of Deccan Herald newspaper.

A date with Oman

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ANURAG MALLICK & PRIYA GANAPATHY savour a platter of experiences – from Portuguese forts and dolphin cruises, ancient petroglyphs and secret wadis – served with trademark Omani hospitality.

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Oman is a country that will astonish you with its riches. The Queen of Sheba’s palace near Salalah was the epicentre of the 6000-year-old frankincense trade and it is likely that the frankincense carried by one of the Three Magi during the birth of Jesus originated here. Sinbad the Sailor is not merely a legend, but a man of flesh and blood who was born in the ancient Omani capital of Sohar.

In the 8th century, Cheraman Perumal, the Chera king of Kerala, adopted Islam (purportedly the first Indian to do so), divided his kingdom among various feudatories and sailed to Mecca; he died while returning and his tomb lies in the Omani port of Zafar. In a country where the tallest structure in any town is not a shiny skyscraper but usually the local mosque, the understated Omani hospitality is disarming.

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Straddling the crossroads of three continents and four seas, Oman’s rich history was shaped by the waters that lap against its rugged shores. Hemmed by the Sea of Oman and the Arabian Sea and guarded by the Al Hajar mountains and the Rub’ al Khali desert (literally ‘Empty Quarter’), it strategically overlooks the Strait of Hormuz at the mouth of the Persian Gulf. The Persians and Ottomans vied for control over the lucrative maritime trade of the Indian Ocean.

Yet, the country’s geography was its security and even the powerful Portuguese could only occupy a few coastal areas. Expelled in 1650 AD, they left behind a slew of seaside forts. Today, Muscat’s twin forts Al Jalali and Al Mirani, besides the Muttrah souq stand proof of the short-lived Portuguese presence in the Gulf.

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But Oman has a lot more to offer than Muscat. We flew to Khasab, an hour’s flight from the capital in the northern-most governorate of Musandam. One look at the Prussian blue fjords surrounded by mauve mountains from our Oman Air flight and we knew why it was called the ‘Norway of Arabia’.

Checking into the luxurious Atana Khasab Hotel, we enjoyed a lovely Arabian spread of fried hamour (fish), Zatar bread, hummus, falafel, moutabel (seasoned eggplant with olive oil) and salads perked up with zesty sumac (lemony spice). We washed it all down with laban (salty buttermilk) and date milk, before setting off on our local explorations.

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Khasab Fort, built by the Portuguese on the site of an earlier fortification, has been renovated into a museum and serves as the perfect curtain raiser to the maritime nation and its well-preserved Arabian culture. Various types of traditional boats graced the courtyard as if they had magically washed ashore.

Around it were specimens of a coffee-making room, arish (summer house) and granary with thematic rooms on the upper floors – a ladies’ majlis, study room, wedding chamber, an apothecary of traditional medicine and a dazzling showcase of costumes, jewellery and ornate khanjars (Omani daggers). We drove along the scenic Coastal Road from Khasab to the fort of Bukha, set against a stunning backdrop of jagged cliffs.

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Oman’s 1600km long coastline brims with adventures – from kite surfing and sportfishing to diving at The Aquarium at Damaniyat Islands, whale watching at Mirbat, bird spotting at the wetlands of Masirah Island and turtle hatching at Ras al Jinz. Back in Khasab, a traditional Omani dhow waited for us with friendly staff at our service with fruits and cool drinks as we lounged on plush carpets. The crags were studded with large flocks of nesting cormorants feeding their young while others dived and emerged to dry their wings on the rocky perches. Dolphins cleaved through clear blue waters, outpacing our dhow with graceful leaps.

We soon docked near Telegraph Island, named after the undersea telegraph system set up by the British in 1854 to send messages from Karachi to London along the Persian Gulf submarine cable. Today, its rich marine life and stunning tropical fish was a magnet for snorkelers and divers seeking hammerheads, leopard whale sharks, mink whales, mantas, eagle rays and turtles. Donning our masks and fins, we plunged into the clear waters for a sublime experience.

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Oman is also home to the loftiest peak in the Arabian Peninsula – Jebel Shams, often compared to the Grand Canyon for its rugged untamed beauty. But we were headed on a winding offroad drive to the 2,087 m high Jebel Harim, or the ‘Mountain of Women’. According to legend, local women often flocked to this lofty hill to escape pirates when their husbands were away fishing, hence its name.

En route we stopped at a lookout over the stunning fjord Khor Najd, besides Bedouin cave dwellings that were inhabited till the 1940s. At Qida, intriguing petroglyphs (stone carvings) of human, animal and abstract figures indicated the presence of early man. Yet, nothing prepared us for the sight of marine fossils high up in the mountain, imprinted on rocks when the Arabian and Eurasian tectonic plates of a restless earth collided around 90 million years ago!

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We flew back to glitzy Muscat, which seemed a world apart from remote Musandam. The imprint of Sultan Qaboos was everywhere with roads, grand mosques and portraits paying tribute to the dynamic sultan who had literally pulled the sultanate from the dark ages, transforming it into a modern state.

After luxuriating at the opulent Shangri-La Hotel, we drove to A’Sharqiyah or Wahiba Sands for some glamping at Desert Nights Camp. Our plush tent with stunning rugs and carpets was indeed fit for a sultan. It was a short offroad drive to catch the sunset over the dunes, which changed colour with every passing moment.

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The 12,500 sq km desert tract stretched 180 km by 80 km in the Ash Sharqiyah province (literally, Eastern Region) and was earlier called Ramlat al-Wahiba, named after the predominant al-Wahiba tribe inhabiting the region. Choosing to trudge down the sandy slopes to the camp, we were greeted by the sweet strains of the oud (traditional stringed instrument) and darbouka (goblet drum) while the smoky aroma of barbecues wafted as we dined under a starlit sky. It was a lavish Arabian spread of shuwa (meats), rice, Zatar bread, labneh, date milk and camel milk.

In the morning, we enjoyed a complimentary camel ride around the resort and tried quad biking and sandboarding, before our guide Mohammad from Khimji Travels took us dune bashing. It was a quick pitstop at Al Wasil to fill air into the tyres, which had been deflated to reduce the air pressure for the desert.

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Our next destination was Wadi Bani Khalid, the best-known wadi (freshwater pool) in the region, part of the eastern chain of the Al Hajar mountains that soared up to 2000 m. Till the 1970s there was no road access and people could get here only on donkeys or on foot. We trudged along the falaj or irrigation canal lined by date palms to the oasis. Serving coffee with a platter of dates is the hallmark of Omani hospitality. In the old days, the birth of a son was marked by planting a date palm! Enterprising kids deftly maneuvered wheelbarrows to ferry visitors’ luggage on the narrow cemented walkway that lined the irrigation channels.

On reaching an amphitheatre of sandstone ridges and burnished mountains shimmering with copper deposits, we spotted locals enjoying themselves at aquamarine pools. With depths ranging up to 10 meters, the pools were safe for swimming. The scent of char-grilled meats emanated from barbecues in shaded groves of palm trees; someone else burned frankincense in a majmar (charcoal brazier). It was the heady aroma of Oman.

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HOW TO EXPERIENCE OMAN

One of the safest countries in the Middle East to immerse yourself in authentic Arabian culture, Oman is the perfect blend of tradition and modernity. Its long coastline, soaring dunes and rugged mountains bejeweled with idyllic wadis (fresh water pools) are filled with many adventures.

Getting there & Around
The national carrier Oman Air flies direct to Muscat International Airport, Seeb from Mumbai (2h 50m), besides Delhi, Bengaluru, Kochi and Trivandrum (3h 30m). Khasab is a 50-min domestic flight from Muscat while Sharqiya Sands is 203 km via M23 (Muscat-Sur highway) towards Bidbid, Ibra and Al Wasil. www.omanair.com

When to go
Oman is pleasant from October to April barring the scorching summer months from June to August, except Salalah in the south which is washed by the khareef (rainy) season. The annual nesting of green turtles at Ras al Jinz is between July to October.

Visa
1-month e-Visa for Oman is available for 20 OMR (Omani Rial). Those holding a valid visa for US, Canada, Australia, UK, Japan or Schengen countries can get a short-term 10-day visa for just 5 OMR. https://evisa.rop.gov.om/en/visa-eligibility

BUY
Oman’s souks brim with stalls selling frankincense, attars, oils, ornamental khanjars (daggers), antiques, besides Turkish plates and lamps. Pick up a bottle of the best perfume Amouage or choose from hundreds of varieties of dates – Khasab, Farah or Khalas (the most premium variety), besides the glutinous Omani halwa. The medwak or Arabian smoking pipe made of wood, bone, metal, marble, gold, silver or glass is a great souvenir.

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Where to Stay

MUSCAT
Shangri-La Barr al Jissah Resort & Spa

Accessible through a tunnel, the complex of two hotels Al Waha (literally Oasis) and Al Bandar (The Town) has traditional Dhofari architecture with Chi spa offering a 4-hr Serenity Ritual with a frankincense scrub www.shangri-la.com

The Chedi
Luxurious 158-room hotel with Omani style rooms and villas, six restaurants, three pools and a Balinese spa. www.ghmhotels.com/en/muscat/

Al Bustan Palace
Opulent Arab-Art Deco resort with luxurious rooms, majestic 38m domed atrium lobby, five pools and 1km private beach, the longest in Oman. www.ritzcarlton.com/en/hotels/oman/al-bustan

KHASAB

Atana Khasab/Musandam
Atana Khasab is a 4-star resort offering panoramic views of the spectacular Musandam shoreline or the mountains and authentic Omani cuisine while Atana Musandam is inspired by an Omani village with 8 clusters of lowrise buildings that come with private balconies. www.atanahotels.com

SHARQIYA SANDS

Desert Nights Camp
The only luxury desert camp in Oman set in 10-acres with 39 uber-luxury Bedouin style tents and adventure activities in the desert.
Ph +968 92818388, 99477266 www.desertnightscamp.com www.omanhotels.com

1000 Nights Camp
Set amidst golden dunes and Cineraria trees, stay in a choice of luxury tents fitted with reflective glass in the east and west for the perfect view of sunrise and sunset.
Ph +968 99448158, 22060243 http://thousandnightsoman.com

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TOUR OPERATORS

Khimji Travels
Hotel bookings, local transport and tours
www.khimjistravel.com www.touroman.om

Khasab Tours
Dhow cruises, offroad safaris & local excursions in Musandam
www.khasabtours.com

TIP
Women and bedouins are sensitive to being photographed (some believe it captures their soul), so always ask before clicking.

For more info, visit www.omantourism.gov.om

Authors: Anurag Mallick & Priya Ganapathy. This article appeared in the October 2018 issue Travel + Leisure India magazine.

 

Mount Buller: Into the White

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Victoria’s premier ski resort holds many adventures like skiing, tobogganing, snow walks, snowboarding, sled dog tours and a ‘Gnome Roam’, discovers ANURAG MALLICK

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For a town with a population of just 242 mountain folks, it sure felt crowded at Mount Buller. We are used to seeing more people at a traffic signal in India. Yet, between July and September, while the rest of the world sweats in summer or drowns in rain, it is winter in this part of Australia. In this Red Earth country with soaring temperatures and the wild outback, it’s hard to imagine a realm of snow!

Like thousands of adventure enthusiasts, we drove up via the charming towns of Mansfield and Yea (yea there’s a place called that; it also has a funky public convenience sprayed with ‘ToilArt’). At base camp Mirimbah, travellers pick up wheel chains to drive through the snow (mandatory for overnight visitors) and hire ski and snowboard equipment. Flecks of white on the eucalyptus trees soon gave way to a blanket of snow that draped the alpine vegetation. Switching to the free shuttle service at the parking lot, we proceeded to the festive Village Square Plaza.

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Shuffling up the frozen steps past the Clocktower, large crowds in colourful ski jackets thronged the plaza with restaurants, shops and free wi-fi. It was a short walk to Mt Buller Chalet Hotel near the Bourke Street ski run; one could literally ski-in and ski-out. A stuffed bear and moose graced the lobby, alongside ski memorabilia and a chair made of skis. The friendly manager Harry, a local legend of sorts, welcomed us warmly. We feasted on rib eye steak and Tasmanian seafood at the plush Black Cockatoo restaurant and set off to conquer Buller.

A quick change into hired snow gear and we found ourselves on a ski lift for a ‘Discover’ lesson at the Ski & Snowboard School at the Northside Discovery Centre. The only thing we managed to discover was how bad we were at skiing as we grudgingly eyed the rest of humanity zip down the slopes with consummate ease and screech to a halt in a spray of snow, meters away from us. It was the moment from the old Bullworker ads when the macho guy kicks sand in the face of the wimp. Our dreadful attempt at building a snowman made things worse, so we shamelessly posed with someone else’s hard work!

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We weren’t the first rookies on the mountain. Mt Buller’s spectacular scenery and abundant flora and fauna had first attracted aboriginal tribes eons ago. They brought young men to the peaks as part of initiation rituals and rites of passage. In traditional ceremonies, they roamed the mountain ranges they called Marnong (literally ‘hand’ in the Taungurong language) and told them stories about creation and Dreamtime tracks across the land.

Explorers Hamilton Hume and Captain William Hovell were the first Europeans to record a sighting of the peak on a 16-week adventure in 1824. Two years later, surveyor Thomas Livingstone Mitchell identified and named it after Charles Buller, an official in the Colonial Office in London.

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Soon, gold miners, timber merchants and bushrangers headed up the mountain while cattle traders used them as grazing grounds. In 1913, Frank Klingsporn widened the track for the movement of cattle, which opened the way for summer tourism, horse riders and hikers. The old bridle track is still used for mountain biking. After early forays by the SCV (Ski Club of Victoria) and the introduction of the towrope in 1949, tourism in Australia’s first Alpine village snowballed. Today, it gets more than 300,000 visitors in winter and 130,000 in summer.

The Summit Road loop took us to the Arlberg Hotel as we walked across to the Shakey Knees ski run, past the historic Hotel Pension Grimus to Northside Express Chairlift for a scenic chairlift ride. Around us nearly 300 hectares of skiing terrain spread out as the 1805 m high peak towered above. After endless rounds of tobogganing at the Horse Hill Snowplay Park, we donned our outsized snowshoes and clomped around the countryside on a Snow Walk.

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Mt Buller is simply a mountain of activities. Take a ‘Snowplay in a Day’ tour or go on a ‘Gnome Roam’, a family-friendly walk in search of Mt Buller gnomes strewn across the village. In between, catch a movie at Australia’s highest cinema Alpine Central, drop by at the National Alpine Museum on the evolution of skiing in the region, take a scenic helicopter flight over Mt Buller and Mt Stirling nearby and pamper yourself at Breathtaker Spa Retreat, the only spa in town. The region is also an excellent mountain biking destination with the 40 km cross-country Australian Alpine Epic trail, the only one of its kind in the Southern Hemisphere.

However, we were off to Cornhill Road for the ultimate thrill of a 16-dog sled ride with Siberian huskies. Brett and Neisha of the Australian Sleddog Company briefed us on how to guide, brake and turn the sled. After our Mountain View Run Tour, we got to pet our team and play with the pups! Of all the things, the words of Frank Zappa’s song kept ringing in my head “Watch out where the huskies go, and don’t you eat that yellow snow.”

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FACT FILE

Getting there
Fly Singapore Airlines to Melbourne and drive 248 km (3 hrs) to Mount Buller, 90 km from the nearest town Mansfield, from where MMBL (Mansfield-Mount Buller Bus Lines) has a regular bus service. www.mmbl.com.au

When to go
July-August is peak winter season though spring from September has great deals, less people on the slopes, shorter lift queues and warmer weather. In summer, go on hikes and cycling trails.

What to Do
Skiing, Snowboarding & Snow Walks
www.mtbuller.co.au

Australian Sled Dog Tours
www.sleddogtours.com.au

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Where to Stay
Mt Buller Chalet Hotel
www.mtbullerchalet.com.au

Breathtaker All Suite Hotel & Spa
www.breathtaker.com.au

Hotel Pension Grimus
www.pensiongrimus.com.au

Tip: Pick up a B-TAG top-up card for easy access to lifts, lessons, rentals, facilities and Snow Dough (for retail therapy) www.bullerstore.com.au

For more info, www.visitvictoria.com

Author: Anurag Mallick. This article appeared on 22 Sep 2018 in the HT Cafe supplement of Hindustan Times newspaper.