Tag Archives: Indian street food

Eat Street: India’s best street food

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Indian appetite for street food is insatiable and the variety on offer is mind-boggling. Join ANURAG MALLICK and PRIYA GANAPATHY on a food journey of the best street eats from around the country

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It is often said that in India, food and language change every few kilometers. In a vast country like ours, street food is as diverse and limitless, with each region having its own specialties. Many food connoisseurs consider India’s capital Delhi as the national street food capital. From Parathe wale gali in Chandni Chowk to late night anda parathas at Moolchand, thukpa in Tibetan Market to various state stalls in Dilli Haat, Delhi’s street food scene is exciting.

Bittoo, the male protagonist in the movie ‘Band Baaja Baaraat’ would earnestly profess ‘Bread pakodey ki kasam.’ Delhiites are likely to swear by their favourite snack as easily as they swear at their best friend. While chhole bhature is typically Delhi, on the streets you are more likely to find pushcarts or bicycles with large brass containers selling chhola kulcha, a soft flatbread served with chhole that’s dry or curried. Hawkers trawl the streets and office complexes carrying baskets of ‘ram laddoo’ or deep fried moong dal pakodas, topped with grated radish and coriander chutney.

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In the evening, vendors clang their tavas to announce deep-fried aloo tikki or aloo chat. Roasted shakkarkandi (sweet potato chat), bread-omelette and boiled eggs topped with onion, green chilis, coriander leaves, salt and chaat masala rule in winter while summer spells lassi, shikanji, bel ka sharbat (wood apple squash), sattu, bhanta (goli soda) and chuski (ice gola) to quench people’s thirst.

Thanks to the significant population of immigrants from Darjeeling and the North East, momo stalls have sprouted all over Delhi like startups in Bangalore. Explore the bylanes of the old city with Delhi Food Walks.

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One place that rivals Delhi for the tag of food capital is Amritsar. The first eateries popped up around the ‘Lake of Nectar’ being excavated that gave the city its name. The common staple is kulcha, a thick aloo paratha cooked in a tandoor and served with bowls of chana, longi (a chutney made of potato, onion, tamarind and mint) and butter. ‘Suchha da Kulcha’ on Maqbool Road, ‘Ashok da Kulcha’ on Ranjit Avenue and ‘Darshan Kulcha wala’ near Jamadar ki Haveli are the top kulcha joints in town.

For Amritsari chhole, there’s ‘Kesar ka Dhaba’ at Chowk Pasiyan, ‘Bade Bhai ka Brothers Dhaba’ and ‘Bharawan da Dhaba’ at Town Hall. Try the tandoori chicken at Beera Chicken on Majitha Road and Amritsari machhi at Makhan Fishwala and Surjit Food Plaza in Nehru Complex. Wash it all down with lassi at Ahuja Milk Bhandar at Lohagadh Gate or Gyan di lassi.

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Mumbaikars are equally passionate about their city’s eats. From bhelpuri at Chowpatty, chaat at Elco Market, late night roomali rolls at Bade Miyan or fruit with ice cream at Bachelorr’s, Mumbai has its chosen haunts. Besides the ubiquitous vada paav, there’s paav in every form – misal paav, paav bhaji and keema paav. Sure, there’s ragda pattice (chana and aloo tikki chaat), but on the national food stage, Mumbai’s frugal eats fare the same as we would in an all-India exam, ‘satisfactory, but can do better’.

Mumbai’s eponymous quick fix the Bombay sandwich is made at roadside stalls with slices of potato, onion, cucumber, tomato and cheese between pressed toast. Competing with Mumbai’s dabbawalas are the unsung poha makers, a local household industry and the idli-vada vendors of Matunga, which harbours a significant Tamil population.

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Parsi-run Irani cafes dish out brun maska and tea all day long. During Ramzan, the mile-long stretch from Bohri Mohalla to Mohammed Ali Road teems with food stalls selling baida roti, rolls, kebabs, malpua and phirni. The same ambience can be found in Nagpur’s Mominpura.

In Ahmedabad, locals throng roadside stalls like Shri Ambika Dal Vada Centre selling hot lentil pakodas with onion and fried chili. After the jewellery shops in the gold district Manek Chowk down their shutters, the entire area transforms into one giant open-air food court. Local businessmen don’t mind; it’s free security till 2 am! Understandably, a lot of real estate is devoted to churans, digestives and mukhwas (mouth fresheners). However, not everything is vegetarian in Amdavad. Bhatiyar Galli is packed with Muslim non-veg fare like salli gosht, mutton samosas, kebabs and patties (puffs).

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Besides khandvi and khaman (dhokla), Gujarat’s most popular snack is Kutchi Dabeli, a desi burger invented in Mandvi, made with potato, masala, chutneys of tamarind, date, garlic, red chilies and garnished with pomegranate and roasted peanuts. Since the filling is ‘pressed’ together between two buns, the dish is called ‘dabeli’. On an average, 20 lakh dabelis are consumed across Kutch every day.

Surat is synonymous with undhiyu, a mixed vegetable dish, literally ‘upside down’ as the dish is traditionally cooked underground in upturned pots with fire from above. Another Surat special is Surti ‘12 handi’paaya (trotters) and assorted meat parts simmering in twelve different handis or pots.

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In neighbouring Rajasthan, cities are associated with their unique snacks. If Jaipur is known for its pyaaz kachori (best at Rawat Mishthan Bhandar and the iconic Lakshmi Mishthan Bhandar or LMB) and Bikaner has its signature Bikaneri bhujiya, Jodhpur wins hands down with its mirchi bada and mawa kachori. Sign up for a Bazaar, Crafts & Cuisine walk with Virasat Experiences and eat your way through the streets of Jaipur, trying out ghevar, imarti and makhaniya lassi.

In Madhya Pradesh, Gwalior’s local snack is bedai, a poori stuffed with spiced lentils. Every morning, regulars queue up at SS Kachoriwala and Bahadura, an 80-year-old shop in Naya Bazaar for samosa, kachori, scrumptious jalebis and gulab jamuns. Dilli Parathe Wala at Sarafa Bazaar, Agrawal Puri Bhandar at Nayi Sadak and Shankerlal Halwai’s laddus aren’t to be missed, besides the mandatory pack of gajak (sesame, sugar and ghee sweet) from Ratiram Gajak or Morena Gajak Bhandar.

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Indore, royal seat of the Holkars, bears a strong Maratha influence, evident in their love for poha, except that they couple it with jalebi! Sharing a border with Gujarat and Rajasthan, khaman and dal-bati are integral to the Malwa region. Indore’s street food scene is legendary with stalls at Sarafa dispensing garadu (deep fried sweet potato), dahi bada, bhutte ka kees (grated corn fried in ghee and spices), batla (green peas) kachori, sev and khopra patties – an aloo bonda with grated coconut inside! Chhappan Dukaan, a commercial precinct of ‘56 shops’, mostly food joints, is home to legends like Johnny Hot Dog and Madhuram’s shikanji, a sweet concoction of thickened milk and dry fruits.

Many cities have a khau galli or ‘Eat Street’ where locals congregate for their daily fix. In Lucknow, Hazratganj and Chowk, the old market stretching between Gol Darwaza and Akbari Darwaza, constitute ultimate foodie heaven. Melt-in-your-mouth kebabs like shami, kakori and galawati are sold at stalls like Tunday Kebab, alongside kulcha-nihari and Lucknowi biryani at Idris or Lalla. Awadhi cuisine, unhurried and delectable, is best savoured in various halwas and desserts like nimish or makkhan malai.

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The most popular ‘naashta’ or breakfast item across the Hindi heartland is poori-sabzi. In Allahabad and Varanasi, locals also love their kalakand and lal peda. Everywhere in India, bhutta (corn) and moongfali (peanuts), variously called jig nuts, kadlekayi, singh dana or ‘timepass’, are anytime eats, grabbed on the go at traffic lights or by the kerb. In the south, they like their groundnuts and corncobs steamed!

The ultimate street food of all time is golgappa, which is known by different names and comes in subtle variations. Pani puri, puchka, gupchup, pani patase, call it what you may, it evokes the same emotions. Holding a makeshift sal leaf cup, awaiting your turn, you open your mouth till the world sees your epiglottis as you relish the burst of flavours and tangy explosion of tamarind water as you gobble a golgappa whole. It’s an unwritten rule that every round of pani puri must be followed by papdi chat, the drier version, and a gratis sukha (dry one sans masala) in the end.

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In Kolkata, besides kaati rolls, biryani and Bengali sweets, the samosa’s smaller cousin, the singada and aloo chop rule the roost. Kolkata’s eastern nook of Tangra is legendary for its Chinese joints. No train journey in these parts is complete without jhaal muri or puffed rice, spiced with mustard oil, peanuts, Bengal gram mixture, onion, chili, coriander, potato cubes and pickle masala, rattled expertly in a dabba with a spoon and served in a thonga (paper packet) with a sliver of coconut.

Every evening in Bihar, locals snack on mudhi (puffed rice) with kachri (onion/potato fritters) or chura bhuja (roasted flat rice) with lal chana. Bihar’s most well known export is litti-chokha, roundels of dough stuffed with spiced sattu (roasted gram flour), which are doused in ghee and relished with potato mash and thin tomato chutney. Bhola Kewat is a litti legend in Ranchi. Another Jharkhand classic is dhuska, a thick fried poori made of powdered rice and chana dal.

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Nearby ‘Steel City’ Jamshedpur, with its multi-cultural, cosmopolitan air, has its superstars – “Tambi ka dosa, Fakira ka chanachur, Hari ka golgappa, Bauwwa ji ka chai, Kewat ka litti, Lakhi ka rolls, Bhatia ka milkshake…” Jampot folks go into raptures over the taste of nostalgia, reminiscing about their street food heroes like kids obsessing over WrestleMania cards.

Pahala, midway between Bhubaneswar and Cuttack, is lined with shops displaying large cauldrons of rasgulla, supposedly invented in Odisha before local maharajas (cooks) popularized it in Kolkata after migrating to Bengal. Another Odiya heavyweight besides chhena poda and chhena gaja is Dhenkanal bada, a dal vada served with ghugni (yellow pea curry).

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Puffed rice or mudhi is consumed all over India, from Odisha, Bengal and Bihar to Tamil Nadu and Karnataka, where it is known as pori. Across North Karnataka, it’s called mandakki and stalls in Davanagere furiously stir it into spicy variants like khara mandakki, nargis or girmit. At dusk, little angadis (shops) dispense hot mensinkayi bajjis (chili pakoda) from Bijapur to Bangalore. Here, an evening snack is not just local tradition, but considered a sacred birthright. People love their bajjis (fritters) made of potato, onion, lentils or raw banana.

If Maddur is synonymous with Maddur vada and Davangere with its benne dosa made with dollops of white butter, Mangaluru boasts teatime snacks like goli bajji, Mangalore Buns, ambode, uppitu-shira and khara roti. In Hubli’s ‘khau galli’ Durgada Bail, stalls sell unique dishes like ‘tomato omelette.’ Cultural capital Mysore has the holy triumvirate of Mysore dosa, Mysore bonda and Mysore pak (a ghee drenched sweet).

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In Bangalore, major food haunts like VV Puram, Malleswaram, Shivaji Nagar and Mosque Road resound with the chomps of hungry masses. The quick and cheap rolls of Fanoos have sated appetites for years. Local outfits run food walks through the pettah (Old Bangalore), Frazer Town, Basavangudi, Russell Market and Military Hotels.

In Hyderabad, feasting continues in the city of Nizams with biryani, keema samosas, haleem and paaya. Tamil Nadu goes into raptures over their dosai and vadai as much as parottas, besides soondal, a salad of garbanzo beans or chickpeas tempered with onion, chilli, mustard seeds, curry leaves and coconut. Every evening, Chennaiites head straight to the fish fry stalls on Elliott Beach to nibble on an assortment of local fish.

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Across Kerala, the morning starts with puttu-kadla, steamed cylindrical rice cakes with black chickpea curry. Chips made of banana, tapioca and jackfruit are fried in roadside stalls like Kumari Banana Chips in Kozhikode. But the northern tract of Malabar promises a world of lesser-known Moplah delicacies – assorted pathiris (rice pancakes stuffed with egg or meats), bonda, ari kaduka (rice stuffed in green mussels), spindle-shaped unnakaya (mashed banana stuffed with coconut, nuts and raisin) and pazham nerchadu (banana fritters).

Like Iyengar bakeries in Bangalore and other colonial haunts across India, Kerala too has its share of outlets dispensing baked goodies. From Mambally’s in Thalassery, Kerala’s first bakery that opened in 1883 to Delecta and Cochin Bakery in Kozhikode, the bakery culture is omnipresent in India right up to distant Srinagar.

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The famous Ahdoos and traditional Sofi-run bakeries churn out khara biscuit, sheermal (saffron flatbread), baqerkhani (puff pastry), lavas (unleavened bread) and kulchas (brittle bread) topped with sesame and poppy seeds, avidly consumed with kehwa (Kashmiri tea) and sheer or noon chai (salty tea).

In Himalayan regions like Ladakh, Sikkim and Darjeeling, locals pop churpi or yak cheese cubes like popcorn. It smells vile, tastes like cardboard and takes hours to melt in your mouth, but somehow they love it. No matter which street corner you hang around, there’s a food stall beckoning you with a local bite that begs to be tried…

Authors: Anurag Mallick & Priya Ganapathy. This article appeared on 8 October 2017 in Sunday Herald, the Sunday supplement of Deccan Herald.

Jaipur Heritage Walks: Where Secrets Tread

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Between literary sessions at the Jaipur Lit Fest and all-night parties, ANURAG MALLICK finds the stamina to uncover some of the best-kept secrets of the walled city of Jaipur, on foot.

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Pandit Ramkripalu Sharma held the yellowed manuscript with the sure hands of a surgeon, yet at the same time, he held it with such tenderness as if a newborn child had just been handed to the proud father. ‘I have over 1,25,000 such manuscripts in over a dozen languages,’ his voice quavered. ‘Some of them date back to the 14th century.’ To prove his point, Mr. Sharma’s son opened four Godrej almirahs to display endless stacks piled neatly. Above it, glass cabinets were already chock-a-block with more parchment. ‘Where’s the space to display everything? We’ve been planning to move to a bigger location, but let’s see,’ he sighed.

Tucked away in a crowded back lane of Jaipur, this small three-storey tenement housed one man’s life-long obsession with antiquity. ‘Some call it madness,’ Mr. Sharma added softly with a smile. I looked at his private museum of unusual artefacts in awe – brass lamps, wooden dolls, metal statues, paintings displayed wall to wall, medieval games, shoes, textiles, every inch of space had been used judiciously.

In one corner, locks of all sizes and types were on display; some shaped like scorpions and dogs! The scrolls covered everything from spirituality, science, art, architecture and yoga to medieval punishments for committing various crimes. It was fascinating and equally humbling to see the Sanjay Sharma Museum & Research Institute. And it was just the first of my discoveries on a heritage walk of Jaipur.

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Having ‘done’ Hawa Mahal, Jantar Mantar, City Palace and Jaipur’s forts, most visitors consider Rajasthan’s capital city as a mere gateway to the desert state. However, Jaipur’s charm lies not only in its monuments but also in what lies between them. Only a walk within the walled city was the real way to discover its true soul. And what better way to do it than through the eyes of a local resident. Akshat, my well-informed guide represented Virasat Experiences, a travel offshoot of Jaipur Virasat Foundation that specialized in heritage walks and cultural tours.

The Modikhana Walk took us through the historic chowkri (ward) of temples and havelis, named after the Modis, a trading community. The Kalyanji temple displayed beautiful frescos of the incarnations of Lord Vishnu, the Sanghi Juta Ram Jain temple had stunning kundan wall decorations while the Sita Ramji and Tarkeshwar temples predated the city of Jaipur. 

We stopped at Fine Art Palace, a fourth generation antique store cluttered with bric-a-brac. The Afghan family was brought here by the kings to teach the art of tie and dye and the use of bow and arrow to his army. Besides a diagrammatic sketch of their family tree, their visitors’ book was worth a look as some entries dated back to the 18th century!

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In one lane, master craftsmen worked with brass, another alley was dedicated to lac bangle makers while an orchestra of ironsmiths hammered away in Thatheron ki galli. Jaipur’s streets, organized by professions and communities, owed their orderliness to the very foundation of the city in the 18th century.

After a tantrik’s curse reduced the original capital of the Kachwaha Rajputs Bhangarh to a haunted site, they moved to Ramgarh and finally overran the Meenas to found a new citadel at Amber in 1592. By the end of the 17th century, a burgeoning population and scarcity of water led the rulers to seek a new, better-planned capital. It is said that Sawai Jai Singh II’s gaze fell on the chosen site while praying at the Garh Ganesh temple. Consulting a Brahmin scholar from Bengal Vidyadhar Bhattacharya, Jai Singh laid the foundation of a new city in 1727 based on the ancient principles of Shilpa shastra (Vedic architecture).

Built in the form of a Pitha Mandala, the city was divided into nine blocks with wide roads. Every street and market was aligned east to west and north to south. The Eastern gate was called Suraj Pol to mark the rising sun, while the Western gate was called Chand Pol, after the moon. Letters were sent to traders as far as Gujarat, Calcutta and Kabul, inviting them to settle in this new place. And that’s how the various communities and artisans set up shop in streets that still bear their name.

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Nearly 2000 years after Pataliputra, Jaipur lays claim to being India’s first planned city. A good way to appreciate its architecture is the Temples & Havelis tour. Chhoti Chaupad (small square) near Chand Pol, one of the seven original gateways at the walled city’s western end, was the starting point of my second walk. Traditionally a chaupad (crossroad) has temples on all sides – either regular shrines or haveli temples (dome-less shrines within the precincts of a haveli).

As old as the city itself, the twin haveli temples of Sri Chaturbhuj and Roop Chaturbhuj were built by twin merchants. After the first brother, older by 2 minutes, built the first temple, the younger one built an almost identical one to its left within two years! Accessible by raised steps flanked by stone elephants, the temple had a profusion of paintings on the walls, ceilings and pillars. Even in the hot sun, the walls were amazingly smooth and cool to touch. ‘It’s a local technique arish where seven layers of limestone are put on the wall and the last wet layer is rubbed with coconut kernel,’ Akshat explained.

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Walking ahead, we reached Jharlaye walon ki mandir, an unusual 200-year-old Krishna temple with four pradakshinas (circumambulations) on four levels. The owners had been called from Benares to teach wrestling and the art of stick fight. Shri Gopal Sharma said that he still taught wrestling in the afternoon in an akhada behind the house. Taking us to the inner shrine, he pointed out ‘Lord Krishna… with 11 girlfriends!’ Er, do you know their names, I ventured. ‘Lalita, Vishakha, Chapla, Chitralekha, Rangva devi, Gaindva Devi…’ came the reply.

We cut in from the road to reach Atal Bihari or Laal Hathi temple, named after two red sculpted pachyderms guarding the front. The 1839-built Kothari House seemed too florid for comfort, but I was told that elaborate paintings and designs were done on the exterior to indicate the prosperity of the occupants.

Madho Somani, part of a prominent jeweler family in Jaipur, welcomed us into Somani Haveli. By definition, any house with more than one courtyard was a haveli. This one had been neatly restored in the old style and rooms and doorframes bore painted floral borders. A creeper spiraled through the central courtyard as we climbed two floors to the terrace. We looked at the cityscape as the old forts of Nahargarh and Jaigarh looming behind us.

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‘You see that?’, Akshat pointed out below. Before he could even say ‘Tantra Temple!’ I was down in a flash, knocking on what was a very strange door. Two eerie figures carved on the door in Indian garb stood as guards to Rudra Mahadev. One was wearing a strange peak cap. Beyond the courtyard, stood a tiny complex of 11 Shiva lingas. It represented the navagrahas (nine planets) and the sun and moon.

After a quick stopover at Shri Gopinath Ji Krishna Temple and the Ramchandra Temple with beautiful frescos and a gold painting of the City Palace, we reached Bagru Ki Haveli for a well-earned breakfast of aloo, puri, kachori and sweets. It was the royal home of a Rajput family from Bagru, a small village 30 km from Jaipur famous for block printing. They organised workshops for visitors to see the process of printing on tablecloth and saris with wooden blocks.

As I thanked Akshat for being such a wonderful and informative resource, he remarked, ‘But how can you go without doing the ultimate culture and culinary walk?’ I hemmed and hawed about the next day’s flight and my unavailability the following morning when Akshat put an end to the argument. ‘That’s perfect! The Bazaars, Cuisine & Crafts Tour is an evening walk. So I’ll see you at 5 today, Badi Choupar?’ The prospect of missing out on the best street food in Jaipur was too much to bear.

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Thus, having fasted like a lion about to be unleashed into a Roman arena, I was 10 minutes too early for my third conquest of Jaipur. While I waited for Akshat, the words ‘Dal Lassan Pyaj ki Pakodi’ seemed branded into the back of my head and a thousand voices whispered it in my ear like an incantation. I walked up to Santosh Agarwal straining a fresh batch and opened my innings for the evening, when a playful voice piped in ‘Couldn’t wait, eh?’ 

A quick peep into Purohit ji ka katla (a market within a market) and we were soon walking past Swayambhu Hanuman Temple towards Hanuman Ka Rasta. The busy alley bustled with wedding card dealers, bookbinders, paper-sellers, printers and manufacturers of coloured envelopes for the local diamond trade. Gopalji ka rasta was an entire street dedicated to gem stone cutting and polishing.

Legend has it that a few hundred years ago, the area of present-day Jaipur used to be a jungle. While on a hunt from Amer, Sawai Jai Singh II got separated from his party and found sanctuary in the Gopal ji temple, where he was given food and shelter for the night. The king promised that when he built his new city, he would reconstruct the temple and name a street after it.

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For centuries, Jaipur’s royalty and the elite had patronized the city’s talented craftsmen and artisans, who honed their skills over generations. Weaving our way past gold and silversmiths, we visited a fifth generation meenakari craftsman in his workshop. Honoured by a President’s award, he displayed his prize-winning creation – a rainbow coloured bird with an emerald bead hanging from its beak like a pendant. I don’t know whether it was the aromas of evening snacks wafting up from the street or the suggestive image of a bird carrying something in its beak that was the trigger, but we found ourselves magically wafting out of the building and onto Ghee Walon ka Rasta.

We were about to trawl Jaipur’s legendary eateries, their identities closely guarded secrets, virtually unknown to outsiders. Batasa, misri and other forms of crystal and candied sugar were being sold wholesale. Slabs of fresh paneer were stacked on shards of ice like a game of laghori (seven stones). Namkeen Bhandars had shaped their colourful dalmoths, fried peanuts and yellow lentils in geometric designs in glass containers. We started with Dedh sau or Shop No.150. Karodiya Dukan specialized in Hing ki kachori (stuffed asafoetida savoury).

Ramdev Restaurant run by Brijmohan served regular mithais like rajbhog and kesar bati to disco jamun and disco rasgulla. I saw more signs saying ‘Pure Desi Ghee’ than STD/ISD/PCO. We packed a meetha pan (for later) at the 80-year-old Kailash Pan Bhandar before stopping for makhaniya lassis at Johri Bazaar. The thick lassi had the consistency of an unguent! It tasted heavenly but I was so full, it felt like a tumbler of Brylcreem shoved down my throat. We somehow squeezed in some laddus at Nathulal Mahaveer Prashad and rabdi at Ramchandra Kulfi Bhandar.

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Early next morning, I reminded the air hostess twice before take off that I did not want to be disturbed for breakfast. She smiled with saccharine sweetness and asked whether I was unwell and wanted any medicine. I asked her for a pillow instead. Just then the phone rang, rudely interrupting the announcement to switch off all mobile phones. ‘Hello..’, I whispered. ‘Akshat here’, said the voice. ‘Just checking if you caught your flight. In case you missed it, come for the Amer walk. I’ll show you Panna Miah Kund, a step well built by one of Jai Singh’s eunuchs!’ ‘Forget walk, I don’t think I can even fly. Some other time! Along with the Mehrangarh walk,’ I mumbled.

‘Please Sir’, the airhostess said sternly. She had returned with the pillow and held it threateningly, ready to smother me into eternal silence. I put my phone and myself into Flight mode. Just when I was drifting into unconsciousness, a hand tapped my shoulder and a wide lipstick smile in Sugar Plum Shade 086 mouthed ‘Veg or Non-Veg Sir’.

Fact File

Contact
Virasat Experiences
Om Nivas, E–23, Kaushalya Path Durga Marg, Bani Park Jaipur 302001
Ph 0141 5109090-95, 9828220140
Email akshat@jaipurwalks.com 
www.virasatexperiences.com  

The Walks
Price: Rs.1,250
Duration: 2.5 Hours
Group size: Minimum number required 2, Maximum 6
Departs: Daily (subject to local conditions)
Join a walk and receive a copy of ‘Jaipur: Six Walks to Discover the Old City’, published by Jaipur Virasat Foundation

Author: Anurag Mallick. This article appeared in the April, 2012 issue of Rail Bandhu, the Indian Railways’ in-train magazine.