Tag Archives: West Java

Garut: Sweet Taste of Indonesia

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Blessed with a serene natural ambience, Garut, the Switzerland of Indonesia, holds the charm of a land meant for indolent lotus eaters, says PRIYA GANAPATHY

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With Javanese love songs lulling us to sleep on the drive from Bandung to Garut, we reached the gorgeous Kampung Sumber Alam, an exclusive hot springs spa resort. The ‘Garden of Water’ was a virtual floating island of wooden cottages in a lotus-riddled aquatic Eden. A fine example of Sundanese architecture, the roofing was done with the hairy aren palm and shaped like a birdwing! Under a moonlit starry night, it didn’t take us long to immerse ourselves in the thermal swimming pool partly covered by a large sail-like marquee.

Garut’s high altitude ensures year-round cold weather and its gorgeous misty natural surroundings have earned it the tag ‘Switzerland of Java’. The presence of healing thermal baths offering rejuvenative spa treatments give it the air of a European spa town. The chill weather contrasts the novelty of the pools that remain permanently hot with water channelled directly from the volcanic Mount Guntur nearby.

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The thermal waters are also piped directly to your bathtub, so you can soak in the personal comfort of your own room. At the private deck I put my feet up, watching lotuses bloom and river reeds sway in the breeze. Blessed with a serene natural ambience, Garut holds the charm of a land meant for indolent lotus-eaters.

There’s much to see and do here. Our young guide Dede Sunandar recounted how the Papandayan volcano was West Java’s biggest draw besides the Cipanas hot springs and the 8th century Shaivite shrine of Candi Cangkuan. Adventure seekers head to the mountainous tracts of Papandayan, Haruman and Guntur for trekking trails.

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The Papandayan volcano has the largest caldera in South East Asia after Bromo, which along with Tangkuban Perahu are counted amont the most famous volcanoes in Java. The numerous craters in Papandayan are fascinating. Some spit out hot mud, some are hissing noisy gas craters, there are golden craters that resemble gold… its rocks covered in golden yellow sulphurous emissions.

With a population of almost 3 million, most people in Garut Regency practice farming. “People say that the population is high because the weather is so cold. Couples are forced to keep themselves warm in this climate, hence the baby boom,” Dede winked.

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Jawa Barat (West Java) was once a Portuguese trading outpost and Garut has a charming colonial legacy called Delman. The quaint horse wagons, locally called dokarandong or sado, are named after a Dutchman called Dellemann, who introduced this cart to the people. Over time, his name got corrupted to Delman and became a popular, fun means of transport!

We drove past the river Chi Aren which empties into the sea. Our guide revealed that another popular local tradition is ram fights, organised in the villages on holidays. “So popular is this sport, you think the men look after their rams better than their wives and children,” he quipped.

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Beautiful batik

Batik is an Indonesian heritage, designated by UNESCO as a Masterpiece of Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity. And Garut is a great place to learn more about it. Garut’s batik has been world famous since the time of Dutch rule. Characterized by earthy hues like white in combination with purple, dark blue, brown and other colors, the technique of resist painting uses wax on the fabric.

Part of the fabric is covered with malam (beeswax) and a bamboo spout or nib called canting is used to ‘paint’ hot wax with lines or dots onto the cloth which creates a resist pattern. The other method is to use a designed copper block or dye stamp called “cap” and “print” the resist on the fabric. The fabric is then coloured in various shades using this method and the portions with the wax can be melted off by dipping in hot water.

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At Pajagan Rasya Batik Garutan, a batik expert was busy at work, dipping her bamboo canting, blowing it gently and drawing flawless designs on a large ream of cloth. Inside the workshop, we saw them dunk and dye the cloth and boil it to melt the wax before letting it dry in the open. At the shop, we all ended up buying the lovely batik items on display – shawls and stoles, shirts and tunics, even fabric to stitch later! The hand-painted ones were pricier but the printed ones were very reasonable. 

The Batik Museum in Yogyakarta outlines how various cultures have influenced Batik designs. The status of batik grew in 17th century when Sultan Agung of Mataram chose to dress in batik clothes and accorded it importance in ceremonial use. Traditional batik used a lot of browns, yellows and reds or dark earthy hues. Whereas, batik in the coast especially North Java has more vibrant, brighter, tropical colours. A framed panel displayed how every design motif and colour was attributed to a distinct region or theme!

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Leather is the other trademark in Garut, and Sukaregang is the place to pick up the finest leather products. Rows of shops and boutiques display a wide range of leather goods made from the soft hide of local sheep.

From wallets and bracelets to handbags, satchels and jackets in every shade, the exclusive designs sell at outrageous prices in fashion capitals. A prominent silk-producing area, Garut is also known for traditional Ikat weaving where strands of dyed weft and warp threads are handwoven on a loom. 

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Garut’s Good ol’ Dodol

Indonesians have a sweet tooth and you get a taste of it at the sprawling Picnic factory in Garut. Dodol, a brown chewy caramel sweet, is Indonesia’s signature confection, and the brand Picnic has been synonymous with it for decades. For generations, dodol was prepared in homes, but Iton Damiri began manufacturing Dodol in 1949 on a commercial scale.

When Damiri tried to sell his homemade dodol under its original name Halima and later Fatimah at a popular elite store named Picnic in Bandung, the owner wasn’t interested. Damiri rebranded his product as Picnic to woo the shop owner and the rest is history! In 1979, the Picnic Dodol factory was established with only five people. Right now, they have 250 workers who churn out four to six tons of Dodol per day! 

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The main ingredient is sticky or glutinous rice (badvas katang) or rice powder which is used in combination with brown sugar, coconut milk and grated coconut. It takes 9-10 hours to cook with constant stirring before it is cooled and allowed to set for a couple of hours. Initially, dodol had only one flavour, but market innovation and the need to keep up with changing trends, has seen dodol acquire a range of assorted flavours. Today there are fruit-based and nut-based dodol along with flavours like chocolate or coffee, garnishes like sesame and dodol brownies, pies and cookies. 

After a quick guided tour around the factory and a short historical film on Dodol, we headed straight to the shop to tuck in, literally like kids in a candy store! They don’t export it… so we picked up assorted flavours as sweet Indonesian food souvenirs called ‘olah oleh’! We returned to Bandung and picked up some bamboo souvenirs and angklungs, the sweet taste of dodol still on our lips.

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FACT FILE

Getting there: Fly from Bangalore via Kuala Lumpur to Bandung on Malindo Air. From Bandung, drive 130km south/4hrs to Garut.

Where to Stay
Sumber Alam, Garden of Water
Jln. Raya Cipanas 122 Garut, Jawa Barat, Indonesia
Ph: +0262 237700 W: www.sumberalamresort.com 

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What to buy

Batik – Rasya Batik in Garut
JI, Otto Iskandardinata, Komplek PLN No. 1, Garut, Jawa Barat
Ph: 0262 232824 email: rasya.batik@yahoo.com

Dodol – Picnic Dodol Garut Factory
JI, Pasundan 102, Garut 1, Garut Kota, Jawa Barat
Ph: 0262 240717 W: www.picnicdodolgarut.com

Bamboo souvenirs & angklungs – Saung Angklung Udjo
Jl. Padasuka No.118, Cibeunying Kidul, Kota Bandung, Jawa Barat, Indonesia
Ph: 0262 227271714 W: http://www.angklung-udjo.co.id

For more info, visit https://www.indonesia.travel/

Author: Priya Ganapathy. This article appeared on 4 January, 2019 in Indulge, the Friday supplement of The New Indian Express newspaper.

West Java: Paddling around Pangandaran

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PRIYA GANAPATHY traipses around Jawa Barat from Bandung to Banjar by train, bus, boat, bicycle and rubber tube to experience real Javanese culture and cuisine that thrives in its kampungs (villages)

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There’s more to Indonesia that Bali’s beaches or temples like Borobodur. With over 17,000 islands strewn across the world’s largest archipelago, the opportunities for offbeat explorations are endless. I found myself on a train from Bandung to Banjar, as Jawa Barat (West Java) slowly unfolded its pastoral charms. We chugged past lush mountains and brown swollen rivers slithering like snakes through the countryside where farmers in conical hats toiled in their fields. At Banjar, we tried pecel, a local salad served on banana leaf that tingled with spices, crunchy fresh vegetables and peanut sauce.

We took a bus to the lyrically named Pangandaran, a peninsular tract between Central and West Java. Welcomed with traditional batik blangkon (knotted headscarf), worn by Indonesian men, we tucked into an Indonesian buffet at the beachside Hotel Arnawa, replete with fountains and rooms facing a large curvy pool. Later, we set off on bicycles for a cross-country ride to explore surrounding fishing hamlets.

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Located at the isthmus in Java’s south coast, with a national park occupying the fanning headland, Pangandaran is Javanese for ‘a place to make food or earn a living.’ Villagers in thatched huts gutted fish, sorting and drying them outside as cats prowled about picking at the dried fish strewn around. We pedalled past overturned boats lying in open beaches and rode down lanes lined by pretty cottages half-hidden by trees laden with jackfruit, oranges and hairy rambutan.

Pangandaran has two beaches, one on the west and another on the east. At its narrowest point, the neck is only 200m apart! Local guide Taufiq remarked, “It offers the most spectacular panoramas of both sunrise and sunset.” It began raining and we took shelter nearby.

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A young vendor tempted us with a cartload of snacks – from brown whirly putumaya made of brown sugar to the candy-coloured green and pink cetil or gurandil made of cassava. Klepon was a green orb garnished with coconut shavings with a syrupy centre that dribbled down our chins…

Hauling our bikes onto a raft for a river crossing, we cycled onwards to Tegal Jambe, a kampung (village) where villagers had arranged a cultural program. Shy ladies offered us local rainbow-hued sweets, snacks, steamed roots and fruits neatly adorned in woven baskets.

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A chime of woody clicks, tinkles and thrumming beats announced the troupe of black-clad musicians who enthralled us with a superb kentongan (bamboo slit-drum) performance. Led by a comedian–like leader, the Rombongan Bojong Jati ensemble entertained us with traditional Javanese music on angklungs (bamboo instruments).

The predominant home industry here is making gulah merah (brown sugar). Fresh palm nectar tapped from flowers is heated in a large vessel till it caramelises and thickens. Once poured into a mould and cooled, the palm sugar is tapped out as roundels. Being a coastal area, the brackish soil imbues the nectar with a hint of saltiness! Villagers demonstrated how to shin up coconut trees barefoot, strip nipah palm leaf to weave baskets and scoop out tender atap chee (palm fruit). Translucent, like shelled lychee, it is widely used in local sweet dishes.

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Secret Santirah

Most visitors head to Green Canyon for hiking, boating, kayaking and bodyrafting, but we trundled in an outsized bus on an undersized road to the quieter Santirah. “When it rains, the Green Canyon turns murky but Santirah remains clear,” Taufiq revealed. The river tubing or bodyrafting adventure along a pristine 1½ km stretch lasts two hours. Great for all ages, it involves perching on the edge of a large rubber tube, leaning back with feet tucked in the crook of the arm of the person seated in the tube ahead. Thus, with limbs interlinked, the group whooshes down the river, like a human caterpillar!

A clean gurgling river with delightful rapids, four limestone cave tunnels and five waterfalls to soak under, you savour the filigreed canopy of evergreen trees opening into sun-drenched emerald pools and thrilling cliff jumping; Santirah was the highlight of my trip. Being the only ones around, save dragonflies and butterflies hovering overhead, this was a secret side of West Java few knew of. We refuelled at a local shack with fried gorengan (batter-fried cassava and bananas), mi goreng (chicken noodles) and susu jahe (ginger milk)!

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After a short busride to Batukaras, we took a boat cruise into the mangrove tracts along the Cijulang or Green Canyon River, named after the reflective green and blue plankton. Aboard the thatched craft, Shane Josa Resort had arranged a lip-smacking seafood lunch of fried fish, crayfish and batter-fried prawns with rice and local greens.

Disembarking at the Sinjang Kalang pier, we hung around the surfer hangout Batukaras Beach sipping honge juice at RM Kang Ayi. The strange fruit of the torch ginger, shaped like a pineapple-lollipop studded with berries, was blended into an aromatic pink juice with a tart salty-sweet bite.

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Back in Pangandaran, we witnessed Kuda Lumping – a scintillating traditional horse dance at Bamboo Restaurant performed by dancers with painted horses and puppets who slipped into a trance after consuming a shaman’s magic potion. They say, a trip to Pangandaran is incomplete without catching the famous sunrise.

Though deadbeat, I left early, defying the cloudy weather to watch dark waves gilded by the first sunrays. Fisherman silhouetted against the horizon drew in their first catch as children leapt in the waves, awash with the refreshing spirit of dawn.

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Fact File

Getting there
Fly to Bandung via Kuala Lumpur (13-14 hrs) on Malindo Air or via Changi on Singapore Air (15-16 hrs). From Bandung take a train to Banjar and a 2 hr bus ride to Pangandaran or a direct 7hr bus journey from Bandung.

Where to Stay
The Arnawa Hotel, Pangandaran
Ph 0265 639194
www.thearnawahotel.com

Shane Josa Resort, Batukaras
Ph 082295695133
http://shanejosa.com

Mini Tiga Homestay, Pangandaran
Ph +62265639436, +6287826393801
https://minitigahomestay.weebly.com

Gino Feruci, Bandung
Ph +262 224200099
www.ginoferuci.com

Hotel Bidakara Grand Savoy Homann, Bandung
Ph +262 2242332244
www.savoyhomann-hotel.com

For more info, www.visitindonesia.co.in

Author: Priya Ganapathy. This article appeared in HT City/Cafe, the supplement of Hindustan Times newspaper on 21 May, 2018. 

West Java: Bandung & beyond

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Bali remains a favourite holiday destination in Indonesia, but the erstwhile Dutch outpost of Bandung, capital of West Java, offers its own singular pleasures, writes PRIYA GANAPATHY

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Thick plumes of grey clouds shrouded Bandung, forcing the Malindo Airlines pilot to land in the Indonesian capital of Jakarta. One more place to see from the window thanks to stormy weather, I mused, before landing in Bandung four hours later. The first discovery to hit me in Indonesia was my name emblazoned on the men’s washroom! Nelson, my guide chuckled, “Pria means Gentleman in Indonesian! We say, “Pria dan Wanita” for ‘Gentleman and Ladies’.” Nice shocker to kick-start my week-long trip in the world’s largest archipelago.

While Bali remains a favoured holiday destination, I was thrilled to begin in the erstwhile Dutch outpost of Bandung, capital of West Java. I walked in the drizzle from Gino Feruci, a hotel in the heart of town to the popular Braga Permai, earlier Maison Bogerijen, a historic 1923 restaurant for dinner. As the only Indian travel writer in a large blogger group from Kuala Lumpur and Java, I was welcomed with a gusty round of applause for my long voyage to the East Indies.

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Mas Aan, my new Indonesian friend elaborated, “Travelling across Indonesia, you discover a variety of cultures. There are 17,000 islands, each with its own unique traditions! We have 800 native languages and almost 1000 different tribes!” The western part is very popular, mainly because of food. The ancient flourishing trade that Sumatra enjoyed with Arabia and India ensured that many flavours and spices perked up their cuisine.

I had “Bandrek” the traditional drink served in a tall glass as an alternative to soup. This Sundanese beverage is a delightful concoction of water, jahe (ginger), gula merah (palm sugar) and kayu manis (cinnamon) and a perfect highland drink to warm you on a cold night. Indonesians enjoy a wide range of “Jamu” or local herbal beverages prepared at home or sold at street corners.

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I tried “bajigur”, popular in central and east Java, made of coconut milk, brown sugar, ginger and salt. Each drink has unique benefits and is a panacea for beauty or health. Bounded by the sea, there was plenty of seafood and we gleefully gave in to crab and egg fried rice with Puyung hi – a thick omelette laden with vegetables.

Visitors can hop onto Street Gourmet Bandung, the first Indonesian Resto Bus that gives a City Tour with a choice of Sundanese meals. In the morning, Bandung’s distinctly Dutch touch was apparent in its heritage architecture and European-style buildings, cafes and boutiques lining Braga Street. Nicknamed Paris van Java or ‘Paris of Java’ in its heyday, the tag holds true till date. Bandung’s glut of factory outlets has morphed the town into a crowded shopping and fashion capital where traders and tourists buy branded goods at throwaway prices! Cihampelas Street has been dubbed as ‘Jeans Street.’ Yet, under its cloak of urbanity, Bandung hides a lot of history.

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The Bandung Conference

From the Dutch colonial era to Indonesian Independence in 1945, Bandung witnessed several tumultuous events. The Dutch considered a strategic shift of their capital Batavia (Jakarta) to Bandung but the move was foiled by World War II. In April 1955, Bandung shot to fame as the venue for the first Asia-Africa or Bandung Conference, when President Soekarno invited heads of state from 29 countries, including Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru from India, to join hands for world peace and fight oppression.

Nehru stayed at the heritage Grand Savoy Homann Hotel, which preserves suites of its high-profile guests like President Soekarno and Nehru, besides relics and pictures of the event. From here he made the ‘Historical Walk’ with other world leaders to Gedung Merdeka, a monument and museum that preserves the memories and policies of visionary leaders who continue to inspire future generations.

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Located on Jalan Asia-Afrika between the city’s most famous landmarks – Savoy Homann Hotel and Gedung Merdeka – stands Warenhuis de Vries building. The oldest department store in Bandung and a fine example of Dutch architecture, its quaint tower on the right corner is a major landmark.

Built in mid 19th century, it saw a few style changes in the early 1900s but after years of neglect, a superb restoration process by present owners Bank NISP OSBC has transformed it into a iconic symbol of Bandung’s cultural heritage. The distinct decorative street lampposts add a gorgeous touch of old world elegance to the road.

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The historic Gedung Sate (Governor’s Residence), designed by Dutch architect J Gerber, was once the stronghold of the Dutch. The terrace overlooks manicured gardens, the city and distant hills. Traditional Indonesians believe that a home or edifice built facing a volcano will gain power and fortune.

True enough, in the horizon, the legendary volcanic mountain Tangkuban Perahu (‘overturned boat’ in Sundanese) makes its looming presence felt. Tourists often hike to its crater to witness the constantly bubbling hot springs and sulphur fumes – it last erupted in 2013! The Geological Museum in town is a great place to know more about the volcanic craters the region is famous for.

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Clomping around in keloms

Traditional handicrafts thrive in Indonesia. At Kelom Geulis Sagitria Tasikmalaya, a Sundanese clog-making workshop, special wooden shoes called kelom or kelompen popularised by Dutch settlers, are crafted. Worn especially by women, the shoes became famous as Kelom Geulis meaning “beautiful clogs”. The owner, Rana and his son Kilan, outlined the process of how mahogany wood was fashioned into “kelompen”.

A craftsman deftly carved out a freehand design on leather with a sharp tool as another sprayed colour and livened up a sandal. A lady hammered a stud to fix a strap to wood while another inked a motif using a batik style bamboo spout called “canting”. We stood transfixed as plain wood pieces evolved into ‘designer footwear’.

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Today, kelom guelis is a signature traditional Indonesian handicraft promoted by the government as formal footwear for women. Men have it good too with Sagitria’s Kelom Kasep, an exclusive range for men! ‘Kasep’ in Sundanese means ‘handsome’! They also craft the famous Mizutori ‘Geta’ sandals for the Japanese market. Wearing wooden shoes is said to be healthy as its shape and leather straps stimulate acupressure points. They are easy to wear, fashionable, durable and suitable for casual or dressy affairs.

Here’s the fun part. Visitors can try their hand at batik on clogs and return with a souvenir! I was already imagining myself clomping around the streets in my own “klompen”! At IDR 75,000 (₹360) a pair and an entire showroom of eye-catching designs, it didn’t get any better!

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It was strange walking into a large strawberry doorway…but the cheery strawberry-themed Rumah Makan (restaurant) Liwet Pak Asep Stroberi at Tasikmalaya, is a standout for exotic local food. Sitting cross-legged in the traditional lunch hall surrounded by a tropical garden with lotus pools, we devoured a luscious spread of traditional Javanese and Sundanese food on a low long table.

Aromatic Nasi liwet (rice, oil, salt and red onion), Nasi tutug oncom (rice with fermented soya bean and coconut), the delicious Otak-Otak (grilled mackerel in banana leaf), assorted Gorengan (fries of tempe, tofu, banana, cassava), ikan asin (salted fish), Ayam bakar (Soya grilled chicken) and fried fish. The taste and presentation were outstanding. A cup of the infamous kopi luwak or civet cat coffee followed. Touted as the world’s most expensive coffee, this black velvety brew is made using the choicest cherries consumed and excreted by the civet cat!

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Playing the anklung in Bandung

Back in Bandung the following day, a lovely surprise awaited us – a full-blown gamelan and angklung ensemble at Saung Angklung Udjo, a cultural centre that organises workshops where you learn how the angklung is made and how to play it. Children of all ages are trained by maestros to stage world-class performances of traditional music in a grand display of Indonesia’s traditional dances – with elaborate make-up and resplendent costumes.

Udjo is a perfect window to Indonesian culture. After an utterly engrossing presentation of Wayang Golek (puppet theatre) another emblematic Indonesian artform, the show began. In a space designed for audience participation, we were all soon playing Indonesia’s iconic instrument – the angklung! But the genius of maestro Daing Udjo and his live demo made us fall in love with Javanese music. The angklung orchestra even performed jazz standards and Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody!

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Born in Indonesia, the angklung is handcrafted out of simple bamboo and produces an inherently appealing wooden tinkle reminiscent of wind chimes. Its very name is an onomatopic derivation of the klung-klung sound it produces! The Udjo souvenir shop is a treasure of Indonesian handicrafts and goodies – fashion, fridge magnets, batik, bamboo crafts, woven baskets, clogs, besides a range of angklungs. I picked a chain with a tiny bamboo anklung pendant as a reminder of this beautiful country and its glorious cultural heritage.

FACT FILE

Getting there
Fly from Bangalore via Kuala Lumpur to Bandung on Malindo Air. From Bandung, Tasikmalaya is 116km southeast/3hr 30 min by road.

Note
Visa on arrival $35. Currency Exchange 1 INR = 207.41 IDR (Indonesian Rupiah). Don’t let the zeroes bother you. India invented the zero, but Indonesia idolizes it, especially in its currency!

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Where to Stay
Gino Feruci
Jl. Braga 67, Bandung
Ph +262 224200099 W: www.ginoferuci.com

Hotel Bidakara Grand Savoy Homann
Jl. Asia Afrika No 112 Bandung
Ph +262 2242332244, W: www.savoyhomann-hotel.com

Where to Eat
Braga Permai
Jl. Braga 58, Bandung
Ph +62 22 4233 778 www.bragapermai.com

Liwet Pak Asep Stroberi
www.asepstroberi.com

Author: Priya Ganapathy. This article appeared in Indulge, the Friday magazine supplement of The New Indian Express newspaper on 18 Aug, 2017. Here’s the original link: http://www.indulgexpress.com/life-style/travel/2017/aug/18/west-java-bandung–beyond-3158.html